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The history of Japanese psychiatry and the rights of mental patients

Published online by Cambridge University Press:  02 January 2018

Etsuro Totsuka*
Affiliation:
Attorney-at-law (Japan) and Academic Visitor, Forensic Psychiatry, Institute of Psychiatry, University of London
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In ancient Japan, written characters and religions were largely based on Chinese cultures. The first foreign physician was invited from Korea to Japan during the Shiragi Dynasty, when an Emperor became ill at the beginning of the 5th century. Since then, Chinese medicine dominated in Japan until Western medicine was introduced in the middle of the 19th century.

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Creative Commons
Creative Common License - CCCreative Common License - BY
This is an Open Access article, distributed under the terms of the Creative Commons Attribution (CC-BY) license (http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by/4.0/), which permits unrestricted re-use, distribution, and reproduction in any medium, provided the original work is properly cited.
Copyright
Copyright © Royal College of Psychiatrists, 1989

References

Fukazawa, S. (1964) Narayamabushi-ko. Tokyo: Shincho-sha.Google Scholar
Harding, T., Schneider, J., Visotsky, H. & Graves, C. (1986) Human Rights and Mental Patients in Japan. Geneva: International Commission of Jurists, pp. 56.Google Scholar
The International Commision of Jurists (1984) The mentally ill in Japan. The ICJ Review, 32, 1520.Google Scholar
Kaneko, J. (1973) Nihon igaku-shi nenpyou. Tokyo: Nihon-Seishinbyouin-Kyoukai, pp. 156, 332, 336–341.Google Scholar
The Lancet (1982) Japan: Human rights of mentally ill offenders. The Lancet, i, 673.Google Scholar
Totsuka, E. (1985) Ningensei kaihuku eno michi. In Seishin-iryo to jinken (3) Ningensei kaihuku eno michi (eds. Totsuka, E. and Hirota, I.). Tokyo: Aki-shobo, pp. 199240.Google Scholar
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