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How specialist ECT consultants inform patients about memory loss

  • Dalia Hanna (a1), Kerry Kershaw (a2) and Robert Chaplin (a3)
Abstract
Aims and Method

A questionnaire was distributed to consultants with a special interest in electroconvulsive therapy (ECT) at clinics participating in an ECT accreditation process. This aimed to ascertain a consensus of clinical practice regarding informing patients about the treatment and assessment of memory during ECT.

Results

The response rate was 64%. There is consensus on informing patients about the possibility of permanent memory loss. Memory is assessed before and during an ECT course by clinical interview and Mini-Mental State Examination, but rarely at long-term follow-up.

Clinical Implications

Patients need to be informed about the possibility of permanent memory loss before consenting to ECT. Clinical teams need to make greater efforts to assess memory, particularly after this treatment.

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Copyright
This is an Open Access article, distributed under the terms of the Creative Commons Attribution (CC-BY) license (http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by/4.0/), which permits unrestricted re-use, distribution, and reproduction in any medium, provided the original work is properly cited.
References
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2 Rose, D, Fleischmann, P, Wykes, T, Leese, M, Bindman, J. Patients' perspectives on electroconvulsive therapy: systematic review. BMJ 2003; 326: 1363–7.
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BJPsych Bulletin
  • ISSN: 0955-6036
  • EISSN: 1472-1473
  • URL: /core/journals/bjpsych-bulletin
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How specialist ECT consultants inform patients about memory loss

  • Dalia Hanna (a1), Kerry Kershaw (a2) and Robert Chaplin (a3)
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