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Initial treatment phase in early psychosis: can intensive home treatment prevent admission?

  • Matthew Gould (a1), Kate Theodore (a1), Stephen Pilling (a1), Paul Bebbington (a2), Mark Hinton (a3) and Sonia Johnson (a4)...
Abstract
Aims and Method

The aim of this study was to describe the early treatment phase in first-episode psychosis in an area with well-established crisis resolution teams. Socio-demographic characteristics and patterns of initial treatment were investigated for all individuals with first-episode psychosis identified prospectively over a 1-year period in two London boroughs.

Results

Over a year, 111 people presented with first-episode psychosis. Fifty-one people (46%) were initially managed in the community, with the remaining 60 (54%) admitted to in-patient units immediately. By 3 months after presentation, a total of 80 people (72%) had been admitted and 54 (49%) had been compulsorily detained under the Mental Health Act 1983. Thirty-three people were initially managed by the crisis resolution teams and 15 of these were eventually admitted.

Clinical Implications

In a catchment area in which alternatives to admission are well developed, the admission rate for first-episode psychosis was still high.

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Copyright
This is an Open Access article, distributed under the terms of the Creative Commons Attribution (CC-BY) license (http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by/4.0/), which permits unrestricted re-use, distribution, and reproduction in any medium, provided the original work is properly cited.
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BJPsych Bulletin
  • ISSN: 0955-6036
  • EISSN: 1472-1473
  • URL: /core/journals/bjpsych-bulletin
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Initial treatment phase in early psychosis: can intensive home treatment prevent admission?

  • Matthew Gould (a1), Kate Theodore (a1), Stephen Pilling (a1), Paul Bebbington (a2), Mark Hinton (a3) and Sonia Johnson (a4)...
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