Skip to main content
×
×
Home

Involving service users and carers in psychiatric education: what do trainees think?

  • Kavitha Suresh Babu (a1), Richard Law-Min (a2), Tracy Adlam (a3) and Vicky Banks (a4)
Extract

In 2004 the Royal College of Psychiatrists made it clear that it was committed to increasing the involvement of service users and carers throughout psychiatric education. This has been mandatory since June 2005 and it has been a compulsory aspect of psychiatric training for schemes to demonstrate a meaningful involvement of users and carers in the training of psychiatrists.

  • View HTML
    • Send article to Kindle

      To send this article to your Kindle, first ensure no-reply@cambridge.org is added to your Approved Personal Document E-mail List under your Personal Document Settings on the Manage Your Content and Devices page of your Amazon account. Then enter the ‘name’ part of your Kindle email address below. Find out more about sending to your Kindle. Find out more about sending to your Kindle.

      Note you can select to send to either the @free.kindle.com or @kindle.com variations. ‘@free.kindle.com’ emails are free but can only be sent to your device when it is connected to wi-fi. ‘@kindle.com’ emails can be delivered even when you are not connected to wi-fi, but note that service fees apply.

      Find out more about the Kindle Personal Document Service.

      Involving service users and carers in psychiatric education: what do trainees think?
      Available formats
      ×
      Send article to Dropbox

      To send this article to your Dropbox account, please select one or more formats and confirm that you agree to abide by our usage policies. If this is the first time you use this feature, you will be asked to authorise Cambridge Core to connect with your <service> account. Find out more about sending content to Dropbox.

      Involving service users and carers in psychiatric education: what do trainees think?
      Available formats
      ×
      Send article to Google Drive

      To send this article to your Google Drive account, please select one or more formats and confirm that you agree to abide by our usage policies. If this is the first time you use this feature, you will be asked to authorise Cambridge Core to connect with your <service> account. Find out more about sending content to Google Drive.

      Involving service users and carers in psychiatric education: what do trainees think?
      Available formats
      ×
Copyright
This is an Open Access article, distributed under the terms of the Creative Commons Attribution (CC-BY) license (http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by/4.0/), which permits unrestricted re-use, distribution, and reproduction in any medium, provided the original work is properly cited.
References
Hide All
Crawford, M. & Davies, S. (1998) Involvement of users and carers in the training of psychiatrists: making it happen. Psychiatric Bulletin, 22, 4243.
Department of Health (1991) The Patient's Charter. Department of Health.
Department of Health (1999) The National Service Framework for Mental Health. Department of Health.
Department of Health (2000) The NHS Plan. A Plan for Investment. A Plan for Reform. Department of Health.
Department of Health (2001) Involving Patients and the Public in Healthcare: A Discussion Document. Department of Health.
Fadden, G., Shooter, M. & Holsgrove, G. (2005) Involving carers and service users in the training of psychiatrists. Psychiatric Bulletin, 29, 270274.
Ikkos, G. (2003) Engaging patients as teachers of clinical interview skills. Psychiatric Bulletin, 27, 312315.
Livingston, G. & Cooper, C. (2004) User and carer involvement in mental health training. Advances in Psychiatric Treatment, 10, 8592.
Royal College of Psychiatrists (2004) Press release. http://www.rcpsych.ac.uk/pressparliament/pressreleasearchive/pr597.aspx
Southgate, L. & Grant, J. (2003) Principles for an Assessment System for Postgraduate Medical Training. PMETB Subgroup on Assessment.
Spencer, J., Blackmore, D., Heard, S., et al (2000) Patient-oriented learning: a review of the role of the patient in the education of medical students. Medical Education, 34, 851857.
Vijayakrishnan, A., Rutherford, J., Miller, S., et al (2006) Service user involvement in training; the trainees' view. Psychiatric Bulletin, 30, 303305.
Wykurz, G. & Kelly, D. (2002) Developing the role of patients as teachers: literature review. BMJ, 325, 818821.
Recommend this journal

Email your librarian or administrator to recommend adding this journal to your organisation's collection.

BJPsych Bulletin
  • ISSN: 0955-6036
  • EISSN: 1472-1473
  • URL: /core/journals/bjpsych-bulletin
Please enter your name
Please enter a valid email address
Who would you like to send this to? *
×

Metrics

Full text views

Total number of HTML views: 0
Total number of PDF views: 12 *
Loading metrics...

Abstract views

Total abstract views: 50 *
Loading metrics...

* Views captured on Cambridge Core between 2nd January 2018 - 19th July 2018. This data will be updated every 24 hours.

Involving service users and carers in psychiatric education: what do trainees think?

  • Kavitha Suresh Babu (a1), Richard Law-Min (a2), Tracy Adlam (a3) and Vicky Banks (a4)
Submit a response

eLetters

Learning experience

Ruchi Thakur, Specialty Registrar ,Old age Psychiatry
18 February 2008

We all do learn from the experiences of the carers/family of the patient. We all may not have formal patient -psychiatric teaching forums like South Essex Trust but in the ward rounds clinics we do speak to the family of patients. We do feel empathetic towards their difficulties and arrange carer support and respite care if and when needed.

Having a family member come to a teaching session and explain his experience with the patient would make the teaching more interesting and educational. I have heard a lecture by a mother whose son had aspergers andhow she brought him up and managed him. I have heard a lecture by a man with early dementia who felt losing his driving license due to memory problems was more scary to him than losing his memory.Such lectures definetly make us more human and help us get a different perspective about the people who are living with these illnesses. Such lectures take us away from textbook knowledge.

As far as exams are concerned I think carers should be involved in them. This is because exams are not reflective of a daily clinic/ward round. They would become more human and natural if the carers were involved.
... More

Conflict of interest: None Declared

Write a reply

Trainees� views on service user and carer involvement in training: A perspective from the West Midla

Amitav Narula, Specialist Registrar in General Adult Psychiatry
29 January 2008

Babu et al (2008) surveyed the views of trainees in the south of England and state that it would be useful and informative to survey other regions to obtain a national perspective. We would like to share the perspective of the trainees in the West Midlands from a similar survey conducted a year after it became mandatory to involve service users and carers in psychiatric training.

Completed questionnaires were received from 180 trainees across the West Midlands and included SpRs from all specialities and SHOs from all four rotations, giving a response rate of 62%. A greater percentage of trainees (64% cf. Babu et al’s 47%) were aware of the College requirement for service users and carers to be involved in training.

As with Babu et al’s survey, the most common format for service user and carer involvement was during case presentations (77%). However, 61% ofSHOs had also experienced service user and carer involvement as part of their local MRCPsych academic programme in comparison to only 23% of the SpRs. In contrast to other specialities, the majority of Child and Adolescent psychiatry SpRs (82%) had experienced user and carer involvement through their SpR academic programme.

The majority of trainees wanted users and carers to be involved through sharing their experiences and perspectives (82%) and by giving feedback to trainees about their capability, attitudes and skills (70%). However, trainees felt otherwise about user and carer involvement in the planning of their teaching programmes (22%) and in the selection of trainees for training schemes (17%). We suspect this is a reflection of the same reservations highlighted in Babu et al’s survey. We are in agreement with Livingston & Cooper (2004) who recommend a well-structured programme of training and support to users and carers who wouldbe involved in training and believe it to be an essential component in addressing the above concerns of trainees.

The traditional involvement of carers or users through case presentations often places the service user or carer in a more passive role so that meaningful and active involvement in delivering teaching may not be fulfilled. Fundamentally, their involvement in training should be atwo-way process with the trainee, ensuring mutual respect and consideration of their experiences. Overall the introduction and implementation of this major component in training requires balancing the sensitivities and needs of both service users and trainees. Using the experiences of other training schemes and the results of further research and audit will be an integral part in furthering this area of training.

LIVINGSTON, G. & COOPER, C. (2004) User and carer involvement in mental health training. Advances in Psychiatric Treatment, 10, 85-92.

BABU, K.S., LAW-MIN, R., ADLAM, T. & BANKS,V. (2008) Involving service users and carers in psychiatric education: what do trainees think?Psychiatric Bulletin, 32, 28-31.
... More

Conflict of interest: None Declared

Write a reply

Importance of involving users and carers

Shalini Agrawal, StR1 Psychiatry
07 January 2008

Involvement of service users and carers in all aspects of training ofdoctors is becoming an important and integral part of the curriculum and one can see more and more evidence of this happening. As rightly pointed out by Babu et al, with the advent of MMC, more stress is now being placedon direct user involvement. This understandably places junior doctors in an anxiety-provoking situation because somehow users and carers are seen to be ‘on the other side’ and therefore there is a fear that their involvement or empowerment will somehow create trouble for junior doctors.

We as junior doctors must realize that users and carers involvement is not only important but unavoidable part of our training. Therefore we must start thinking about how we can use this important resource for our benefit so that we feel better prepared and more confident when we qualifyto work independently.

In my trust, South Essex Partnership NHS Foundation Trust, we have regular doctors-users/carers meetings. This is part of our in house academic programme. It gives us an opportunity to know what the view is from the other side. Personally, it helps me improve my practice accordingto the needs of the people who access my services. These meetings can sometimes quickly run out of hand with individual problems being discussedmore than the wider issues, but I have experience that with some excellentmoderators it can easily be dealt with. However, one does feel that if users and carers were to be part of regular teaching, then some standardised training will be needed for junior doctors to get any benefitout of it.

However I am quite surprised by the fact that in the survey that Babuet al have done, very few junior doctors felt comfortable with the idea ofusers and carers as examiners or assessors. As far as I know and certainlyin my trust, carers representative is an essential part of consultant interviews. Therefore one can imagine that if they can be part of such an important process as consultant recruitment, then it does make perfect sense that we as junior doctors are used to them being our assessors earlyin our training, which will help us in the long run.

Declaration of interest: None
... More

Conflict of interest: None Declared

Write a reply

×

Reply to: Submit a response


Your details


Conflicting interests

Do you have any conflicting interests? *