Skip to main content
×
×
Home

John Conolly and the treatment of mental illness in early Victorian England

  • Camilla M. Haw (a1)
Extract

This year, 1989, marks the 150th anniversary of the abolition of mechanical restraints at the Hanwell Asylum. It was, of course, John Conolly who carried out this large-scale experiment in the application of non-restraint at Hanwell. He was in charge of the diagnosis and treatment of the 800-odd pauper lunatics in this, the largest of the county asylums. Most of his patients had been insane for many years before their admission to Hanwell from the parish workhouses. The prospects of curing them were slim: Hanwell had the second lowest cure rate among the county asylums, a meagre 6% for the period 1835–1845 (Conolly, 1847).

    • Send article to Kindle

      To send this article to your Kindle, first ensure no-reply@cambridge.org is added to your Approved Personal Document E-mail List under your Personal Document Settings on the Manage Your Content and Devices page of your Amazon account. Then enter the ‘name’ part of your Kindle email address below. Find out more about sending to your Kindle. Find out more about sending to your Kindle.

      Note you can select to send to either the @free.kindle.com or @kindle.com variations. ‘@free.kindle.com’ emails are free but can only be sent to your device when it is connected to wi-fi. ‘@kindle.com’ emails can be delivered even when you are not connected to wi-fi, but note that service fees apply.

      Find out more about the Kindle Personal Document Service.

      John Conolly and the treatment of mental illness in early Victorian England
      Available formats
      ×
      Send article to Dropbox

      To send this article to your Dropbox account, please select one or more formats and confirm that you agree to abide by our usage policies. If this is the first time you use this feature, you will be asked to authorise Cambridge Core to connect with your <service> account. Find out more about sending content to Dropbox.

      John Conolly and the treatment of mental illness in early Victorian England
      Available formats
      ×
      Send article to Google Drive

      To send this article to your Google Drive account, please select one or more formats and confirm that you agree to abide by our usage policies. If this is the first time you use this feature, you will be asked to authorise Cambridge Core to connect with your <service> account. Find out more about sending content to Google Drive.

      John Conolly and the treatment of mental illness in early Victorian England
      Available formats
      ×
Copyright
This is an Open Access article, distributed under the terms of the Creative Commons Attribution (CC-BY) license (http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by/4.0/), which permits unrestricted re-use, distribution, and reproduction in any medium, provided the original work is properly cited.
References
Hide All
Conolly, J. (1830) An Inquiry Concerning the Indications of Insanity. Reprinted with an introduction by Hunter, R. & MacAlpine, I. (1964). London: Dawsons. pp 17, 411, 424, 480.
Conolly, J. (1847) The Construction and Government of Lunatic Asylums. Reprinted with an introduction by Hunter, R. & MacAlpine, I. (1968). London: Dawsons. pp 9, 151.
Conolly, J. (1846) Clinical lectures on the principal forms of insanity. The Lancet, pp 55, 110, 113.
Conolly, J. Treatment of the Insane without Mechanical Restraints. Reprinted with an introduction by Hunter, R. & MacAlpine, I. London: Dawsons.
Esquirol, E. (1845) Mental Maladies. A treatise on Insanity. Translated with additions by Hunt, E. K. Reprinted 1965. New York: Hafner. pp 84, 86, 87.
Fourth Report of the Resident Physician at the Hanwell Asylum, 1842. p 42.
Hill, R. G. (1838) Total Abolition of Personal Restraints in the Treatment of the Insane. A Lecture. London: Simpkin, Marshall & Co.
Illustrated London News, 20 May 1843; 15 January 1848.
Male Casebook, 1850–1854. Greater London Record Office. p 30.
Maudsley, H. (1866) Memoir of the late John Conolly. Journal of Mental Science, 12, 151174.
Morison, A. (1828) Cases of mental disease, with practical observations… for the use of students. In Three Hundred Years of Psychiatry (eds. R. Hunter & A. MacAlpine) (1963). Oxford University Press. p 600.
Report of the Resident Physician at the Hanwell Asylum, (1840). pp 30, 62, 65, 66, 69, 75.
Reports of the Resident Physicians at Hanwell (1842). p 83.
Rush, B. (1812) Medical Inquiries and Observations upon the Diseases of the Mind. Reprinted with an introduction by Wortis, S. B. (1962). New York: Hafner.
Scull, A. (1985) A Victorian alienist. In The Anatomy of Madness, vol. 2, (eds. W. F. Bynum, R. Porter & M. Shepherd) London: Tavistock.
The Times, 18 November 1840, p 6; 8 December 1841, p 3.
Tuke, S. (1813) Description of the Retreat. Reprinted 1964 with an introduction by Hunter, R. & MacAlpine, A. London: Dawsons.
Recommend this journal

Email your librarian or administrator to recommend adding this journal to your organisation's collection.

BJPsych Bulletin
  • ISSN: 0955-6036
  • EISSN: 1472-1473
  • URL: /core/journals/bjpsych-bulletin
Please enter your name
Please enter a valid email address
Who would you like to send this to? *
×

Metrics

Abstract views

Total abstract views: 16 *
Loading metrics...

* Views captured on Cambridge Core between 2nd January 2018 - 23rd April 2018. This data will be updated every 24 hours.

John Conolly and the treatment of mental illness in early Victorian England

  • Camilla M. Haw (a1)
Submit a response

eLetters

No eLetters have been published for this article.

×

Reply to: Submit a response


Your details


Conflicting interests

Do you have any conflicting interests? *