Skip to main content
×
×
Home

Monitoring weight and blood glucose in in-patients: how helpful is a protocol?

  • Olga Runcie (a1), Marie Boilson (a2) and Ross Hamilton (a3)
Abstract
Aims and Method

Following a survey in 2001, a protocol for monitoring weight and blood glucose of psychiatric in-patients receiving antipsychotic drugs was developed. The effect of this protocol was investigated by comparing 61 admissions in 2004 with the 2001 in-patients.

Results

No significant improvement in recording of admission weight or blood glucose was observed. Ongoing monitoring of weight after admission was significantly more common. For only 29% of patients studied in 2004 was there complete adherence to the protocol.

Clinical Implications

In spite of the availability of a protocol and education, the results suggest that monitoring of weight and blood glucose is still haphazard for psychiatric in-patients. The implications for out-patient monitoring are discussed.

  • View HTML
    • Send article to Kindle

      To send this article to your Kindle, first ensure no-reply@cambridge.org is added to your Approved Personal Document E-mail List under your Personal Document Settings on the Manage Your Content and Devices page of your Amazon account. Then enter the ‘name’ part of your Kindle email address below. Find out more about sending to your Kindle. Find out more about sending to your Kindle.

      Note you can select to send to either the @free.kindle.com or @kindle.com variations. ‘@free.kindle.com’ emails are free but can only be sent to your device when it is connected to wi-fi. ‘@kindle.com’ emails can be delivered even when you are not connected to wi-fi, but note that service fees apply.

      Find out more about the Kindle Personal Document Service.

      Monitoring weight and blood glucose in in-patients: how helpful is a protocol?
      Available formats
      ×
      Send article to Dropbox

      To send this article to your Dropbox account, please select one or more formats and confirm that you agree to abide by our usage policies. If this is the first time you use this feature, you will be asked to authorise Cambridge Core to connect with your <service> account. Find out more about sending content to Dropbox.

      Monitoring weight and blood glucose in in-patients: how helpful is a protocol?
      Available formats
      ×
      Send article to Google Drive

      To send this article to your Google Drive account, please select one or more formats and confirm that you agree to abide by our usage policies. If this is the first time you use this feature, you will be asked to authorise Cambridge Core to connect with your <service> account. Find out more about sending content to Google Drive.

      Monitoring weight and blood glucose in in-patients: how helpful is a protocol?
      Available formats
      ×
Copyright
This is an Open Access article, distributed under the terms of the Creative Commons Attribution (CC-BY) license (http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by/4.0/), which permits unrestricted re-use, distribution, and reproduction in any medium, provided the original work is properly cited.
References
Hide All
Allison, D. B. & Casey, D. E. (2001) Antipsychotic-induced weight gain: a review of the literature. Journal of Clinical Psychiatry, 62 (suppl. 7), 2231.
American Diabetes Association et al (2004) Consensus Development Conference on Antipsychotic Drugs and Obesity and Diabetes. Journal of Clinical Psychiatry, 65, 267272.
Boilson, M. & Hamilton, R. J. (2003) A survey of monitoring of weight and blood glucose in in-patients. Psychiatric Bulletin, 27, 424426.
Bushe, C. & Leonard, B. (2004) Association between atypical antipsychotic agents and type 2 diabetes: review of prospective clinical data. British Journal of Psychiatry, 184 (suppl. 47), 8793.
Casey, D. E., Haupt, D.W., Newcomer, J.W., et al (2004) Antipsychotic-induced weight gain and metabolic abnormalities: implication for increased mortality in patients with schizophrenia. Journal of Clinical Psychiatry, 65 (suppl. 7), 417.
Committee on Safety of Medicines (2002) Olanzapine (Zyprexa) and diabetes. Current Problems in Pharmacovigilance, 28, 3. http://www.mhra.gov.uk
Haupt, D. & Newcomer, J. (2001) Hyperglycaemia and antipsychotic medications. Journal of Clinical Psychiatry, 62 (suppl. 27), 1526.
Lebovitz, H. E. (2003) Metabolic consequences of atypical antipsychotic drugs. Psychiatric Quarterly, 74, 277290.
Marder, S. R., Essock, S. M., Miller, A.L., et al (2002) The Mount Sinai Conference on the pharmacotherapy of schizophrenia. Schizophrenia Bulletin, 28, 516.
Menza, M., Vreeland, B., Minsky, S., et al (2004) Managing atypical antipsychotic-associated weight gain: 12 month data on a multimodal weight control program. Journal of Clinical Psychiatry, 65, 471477.
Scottish Intercollegiate Guidelines Network (1996) Obesity in Scotland. Integrating Prevention with Weight Management. http://www.sign.ac.uk/pdf/sign8.pdfsearch=%22obesity%20in%Scotland%22
Taylor, D., Paton, C. & Kerwin, R. (2003) The Maudsley Prescribing Guidelines (7th edn). Taylor & Francis.
Taylor, D., Young, C., Esop, R., et al (2004) Testing for diabetes in hospitalised patients prescribed antipsychotic drugs. British Journal of Psychiatry, 185, 152156.
World Health Organization (1992) The ICD–10 Classification of Mental and Behavioural Disorder: Clinical Descriptions and Diagnostic Guidelines. WHO.
Recommend this journal

Email your librarian or administrator to recommend adding this journal to your organisation's collection.

BJPsych Bulletin
  • ISSN: 0955-6036
  • EISSN: 1472-1473
  • URL: /core/journals/bjpsych-bulletin
Please enter your name
Please enter a valid email address
Who would you like to send this to? *
×

Metrics

Full text views

Total number of HTML views: 0
Total number of PDF views: 12 *
Loading metrics...

Abstract views

Total abstract views: 22 *
Loading metrics...

* Views captured on Cambridge Core between 2nd January 2018 - 16th July 2018. This data will be updated every 24 hours.

Monitoring weight and blood glucose in in-patients: how helpful is a protocol?

  • Olga Runcie (a1), Marie Boilson (a2) and Ross Hamilton (a3)
Submit a response

eLetters

No eLetters have been published for this article.

×

Reply to: Submit a response


Your details


Conflicting interests

Do you have any conflicting interests? *