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Postal survey of psychiatrists' knowledge and attitudes towards driving and mental illness

  • M. E. Jan Wise (a1) and James P. Watson (a2)
Abstract
Aims and Method

We assessed psychiatrists' knowledge and attitudes towards the Driver and Vehicle Licensing Agency (DVLA) regulations concerning mental illness. A postal survey of all consultant and trainee psychiatrists (228) on the South Thames (East) regional psychiatry rotation was carried out.

Results

For category 1 (private car and motorcycles) licenses, 40.0% of psychiatrists could correctly advise patients with a bipolar affective disorder; this figure was 0% for schizophreniform disorders. For category 2 (heavy goods vehicles) licenses the corresponding figures were 13.2% and 11.8%, respectively.

For alcohol misuse, alcohol dependency and alcohol related disorders, the scores were 26.0%, 29.1% and 19.7%.

Clinical Implications

Psychiatrists fail to know or apply existing DVLA regulations, for a number of reasons. Failure to inform patients of the restrictions and to record this may result in medico-legal liability for practitioners.

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Copyright
This is an Open Access article, distributed under the terms of the Creative Commons Attribution (CC-BY) license (http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by/4.0/), which permits unrestricted re-use, distribution, and reproduction in any medium, provided the original work is properly cited.
References
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BJPsych Bulletin
  • ISSN: 0955-6036
  • EISSN: 1472-1473
  • URL: /core/journals/bjpsych-bulletin
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Postal survey of psychiatrists' knowledge and attitudes towards driving and mental illness

  • M. E. Jan Wise (a1) and James P. Watson (a2)
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