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Psychiatry and the WWW: some implications

  • C. Senior (a1), M. L. Phillips (a1) and A. S. David (a1)
Abstract

This paper highlights the role that the World Wide Web (WWW) has to play as an aid to psychiatry. A basic history of the WWW is provided as is an introduction to some search techniques involved with the WWW. The literature on applications potentially relevant to psychiatry is reviewed using computer search facilities (BIDS, PsychLit and Medline). The WWW is one of the aspects of the Internet that possesses a huge potential for exploitation, both the clinical and research psychiatrist are able to benefit from its use.

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Copyright
This is an Open Access article, distributed under the terms of the Creative Commons Attribution (CC-BY) license (http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by/4.0/), which permits unrestricted re-use, distribution, and reproduction in any medium, provided the original work is properly cited.
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References
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BJPsych Bulletin
  • ISSN: 0955-6036
  • EISSN: 1472-1473
  • URL: /core/journals/bjpsych-bulletin
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Psychiatry and the WWW: some implications

  • C. Senior (a1), M. L. Phillips (a1) and A. S. David (a1)
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