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Recruitment and retention in psychiatry – the role of PMETB

  • Nicole Fung (a1), Elizabeth Furlong (a2) and Lathika Weerasena (a3)
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Abstract
Copyright
This is an Open Access article, distributed under the terms of the Creative Commons Attribution (CC-BY) license (http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by/4.0/), which permits unrestricted re-use, distribution, and reproduction in any medium, provided the original work is properly cited.
References
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Brown, N. & Bhugra, D. (2005) The European Working Time Directive. Psychiatric Bulletin, 29, 161163.
Mears, A., Kendall, T., Katona, C., et al (2002) Career Intentions in Psychiatric Trainees and Consultants. Department of Health.
Vassilas, C. A. & Brown, N. (2005) Specialist registrar training: at the crossroads (again). Psychiatric Bulletin, 29, 4748.
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BJPsych Bulletin
  • ISSN: 0955-6036
  • EISSN: 1472-1473
  • URL: /core/journals/bjpsych-bulletin
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Recruitment and retention in psychiatry – the role of PMETB

  • Nicole Fung (a1), Elizabeth Furlong (a2) and Lathika Weerasena (a3)
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eLetters

Staff grade posts after membership

MYOORAN CANAGARATNAM, SHO Psychiatry
16 February 2007

I read with interest the letter by Fung, Furlong and Weerasena, regarding psychiatrists taking SAS posts, after membership. Whilst it is true that many doctors take these posts in order to gain additional clinical experience, this may not tell the full story.

Several of my colleagues have taken staff grade posts because withoutthis additional clinical experience, they have been unable to secure places on specialist registrar rotations. This applies particularly in fields such as Forensics, and Child and Adolescent psychiatry. At the sametime, these posts may offer the time and opportunity to become involved inresearch and teaching, which has not been possible in busy training posts.Again such activities have been requirements for progression to further training. As such, the numbers of doctors taking SAS posts may be a reflection of the level of competition there has been for SpR jobs, ratherthan an indictment of the quality of training at SHO level.

With modernizing medical careers, most doctors post membership are anxious to gain entry at ST4 level, as uncertainties remain regarding how easy it will be to get onto the run through system, after the initial intake in August 2007. Previously, doctors who were unsuccessful in applying for higher training in specialities and geographical areas of their choice would take SAS posts and wait for the next round. This now does not appear a viable option. I echo the call of the authors for greater clarity regarding re-entry into the training system.
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Conflict of interest: None Declared

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