Skip to main content
×
×
Home

Researching recovery from psychosis: a user-led project

  • Liz Pitt (a1), Martina Kilbride (a2), Sarah Nothard (a3), Mary Welford (a2) and Anthony P. Morrison (a4)...
Abstract
Aims and Method

Involvement of service users in the research process and examination of recovery from psychosis are two topics that have generated recent interest within the research community. This user-led study examines the subjective experience of recovery in people with experience of psychosis. Seven interviews were analysed using interpretative phenomenological analysis and several themes emerged from the data.

Results

Recovery from psychosis was found to be a complex and idiosyncratic process, which often involved rebuilding life, rebuilding self and hope for a better future (each of these themes consisted of sub-themes).

Clinical Implications

The importance of continuity of care, the need for greater choice in approaches aimed at alleviating distress, access to stories of recovery and encouragement, and the importance of more individualised recovery care plans are among factors highlighted.

  • View HTML
    • Send article to Kindle

      To send this article to your Kindle, first ensure no-reply@cambridge.org is added to your Approved Personal Document E-mail List under your Personal Document Settings on the Manage Your Content and Devices page of your Amazon account. Then enter the ‘name’ part of your Kindle email address below. Find out more about sending to your Kindle. Find out more about sending to your Kindle.

      Note you can select to send to either the @free.kindle.com or @kindle.com variations. ‘@free.kindle.com’ emails are free but can only be sent to your device when it is connected to wi-fi. ‘@kindle.com’ emails can be delivered even when you are not connected to wi-fi, but note that service fees apply.

      Find out more about the Kindle Personal Document Service.

      Researching recovery from psychosis: a user-led project
      Available formats
      ×
      Send article to Dropbox

      To send this article to your Dropbox account, please select one or more formats and confirm that you agree to abide by our usage policies. If this is the first time you use this feature, you will be asked to authorise Cambridge Core to connect with your <service> account. Find out more about sending content to Dropbox.

      Researching recovery from psychosis: a user-led project
      Available formats
      ×
      Send article to Google Drive

      To send this article to your Google Drive account, please select one or more formats and confirm that you agree to abide by our usage policies. If this is the first time you use this feature, you will be asked to authorise Cambridge Core to connect with your <service> account. Find out more about sending content to Google Drive.

      Researching recovery from psychosis: a user-led project
      Available formats
      ×
Copyright
This is an Open Access article, distributed under the terms of the Creative Commons Attribution (CC-BY) license (http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by/4.0/), which permits unrestricted re-use, distribution, and reproduction in any medium, provided the original work is properly cited.
References
Hide All
Allott, P., Loganathan, L. & Fulford, K.W. M. (2002) Discovering hope for recovery from a British perspective: a review of a selection of recovery literature, implications for practice and systems change. Canadian Journal of Community Mental Health, 21, 1333.
Andresen, R., Oades, L. & Caputi, P. (2003) The experience of recovery from schizophrenia: towards an empirically validated stage model. Australian and New Zealand Journal of Psychiatry, 37, 586594.
Anthony, W. A. (1993) Recovery from mental illness: the guiding vision of the mental health service system in the 1900s. Psychosocial Rehabilitation Journal, 16, 1123.
Baker, S. & Strong, S. (2001). Roads to Recovery: How People with Mental Health Problems Recover and Find Ways of Coping. Mind.
Deegan, P. E. (1988) Recovery: the lived experience of rehabilitation. Psychosocial Rehabilitation Journal, 11, 1119.
Department of Health (2001) The Journey to Recovery – The Government's Vision for Mental Healthcare. Department of Health.
Jacobson, N. & Greenley, D. (2001) What is recovery? A conceptual model and explication. Psychiatric Services, 52, 482485.
Leete, E. (1989) How I perceive and manage my illness. Schizophrenia Bulletin, 15, 197200.
Repper, J. & Perkins, R. (2003) Social Inclusion and Recovery: A Model for Mental Health Practice. Baillière Tindall.
Ridgeway, P. (2001) Restorying psychiatric disability: learning from first person recovery narratives. Psychiatric Rehabilitation Journal, 24, 335343.
Rose, D. (2003) Collaborative research between users and professionals: peaks and pitfalls. Psychiatric Bulletin, 27, 404406.
Smith, J. A. & Osborn, M. (2003) Interpretative phenomenological analysis. In Qualitative Psychology – A Practical Guide to Research Methods (ed. Smith, J. A.), pp. 5180. Sage.
Smith, M. K. (2000) Recovery from severe psychiatric disability: findings of a qualitative study. Psychiatric Rehabilitation Journal, 24, 149158.
Tandy, C. (2003) How do service users account for their recovery from serious mental illness? MSc Thesis, University of Sheffield.
Tew, J. (2002) Going social: championing a holistic model of mental distress within professional education. Social Work Education 21, 143155.
Turner-Crowson, J. & Wallcraft, J. (2002) The recovery vision for mental health services and research: a British perspective. Psychiatric Rehabilitation Journal, 25, 245255.
Unzicker, R. (1989) On my own: a personal journey through madness and re-emergence. Psychosocial Rehabilitation Journal, 13, 7177.
Warren, K. (2003) Exploring the Concept of Recovery from the Perspective of People with Mental Health Problems. Social Work Monographs.
Recommend this journal

Email your librarian or administrator to recommend adding this journal to your organisation's collection.

BJPsych Bulletin
  • ISSN: 0955-6036
  • EISSN: 1472-1473
  • URL: /core/journals/bjpsych-bulletin
Please enter your name
Please enter a valid email address
Who would you like to send this to? *
×

Metrics

Full text views

Total number of HTML views: 7
Total number of PDF views: 153 *
Loading metrics...

Abstract views

Total abstract views: 253 *
Loading metrics...

* Views captured on Cambridge Core between 2nd January 2018 - 21st July 2018. This data will be updated every 24 hours.

Researching recovery from psychosis: a user-led project

  • Liz Pitt (a1), Martina Kilbride (a2), Sarah Nothard (a3), Mary Welford (a2) and Anthony P. Morrison (a4)...
Submit a response

eLetters

No eLetters have been published for this article.

×

Reply to: Submit a response


Your details


Conflicting interests

Do you have any conflicting interests? *