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Safety at work: national survey of psychiatrists in basic training in Ireland

  • Gavin Rush (a1), Julianne Reidy (a2), Brenda Wright (a3), Fiona Campbell (a4), Maria Ryan (a5), Guy Molyneux (a6), Anita Ambikapathy (a7) and Peter Leonard (a8)...
Abstract
Aims and Methods

To investigate the experiences of Irish psychiatric trainees in relation to safety at work and the related training issues. A questionnaire was posted to 243 psychiatric trainees throughout Ireland.

Results

We obtained 113 responses (46.5%). Results indicated that tutors appear to consider safety at work as an important component of training. The availability of breakaway or similar training is much bigger than previously reported in Ireland. The standard of induction courses appears to be high. However, problems in working environments were revealed: 16% of trainees had been physically assaulted and 72% have felt threatened in the workplace.

Clinical Implications

Despite improvements in training in Ireland, workplaces remain largely unsafe, putting staff and patients at risk.

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Copyright
This is an Open Access article, distributed under the terms of the Creative Commons Attribution (CC-BY) license (http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by/4.0/), which permits unrestricted re-use, distribution, and reproduction in any medium, provided the original work is properly cited.
References
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British Medical Association (2005) Survey of Trainee Doctors Working in Psychiatry. Health Policy and Economic Research Unit (http://www.bma.org.uk/ap.nsf/Content/NIviolence06).
Campbell, H. L. & Fung, N. K. (2007) How safe are patient interview rooms? Psychiatric Bulletin, 31, 1013.
Guido, P. S., Eybrouck, E. S. P., De Gucht, V., et al (2005) Assaults by patients on psychiatric trainees: frequency and training issues. Psychiatric Bulletin, 29, 168170.
Health Service Executive (2006) Corporate Safety Statement. Health Service Executive.
Meagher, D., Quinn, J., O'Mahoney, E., et al (1997) Trainee attitudes towards their training and its supervision. Irish Journal of Psychological Medicine, 14, 2023.
O'Mahony, E. & Corvin, A. (2001) The attitudes of Irish trainees to their training and its supervision: a five-year follow up study. Irish Journal of Psychological Medicine, 18, 120125.
Osborn, D. P. J. & Tang, S. (2001) Effectiveness of audit in improving interview room safety. Psychiatric Bulletin, 25, 9294.
O'Sullivan, M. & Meagher, D. (1998) Assaults on psychiatrists: a three-year retrospective study. Irish Journal of Psychological Medicine, 15, 5457.
Royal College of Psychiatrists (1999) Safety of Trainees in Psychiatry. (Council Report CR78) (http://www.rcpsych.ac.uk/pdf/cr78.pdf).
Sipos, A., Balmer, R. & Tattan, T. (2003) Better safe than sorry: a survey of safety awareness and safety provisions in the workplace among specialist registrars in the South West. Psychiatric Bulletin, 27, 354357.
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BJPsych Bulletin
  • ISSN: 0955-6036
  • EISSN: 1472-1473
  • URL: /core/journals/bjpsych-bulletin
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Safety at work: national survey of psychiatrists in basic training in Ireland

  • Gavin Rush (a1), Julianne Reidy (a2), Brenda Wright (a3), Fiona Campbell (a4), Maria Ryan (a5), Guy Molyneux (a6), Anita Ambikapathy (a7) and Peter Leonard (a8)...
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