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Secure in-patient services for people with learning disability: is the market serving the user well?

  • Evan Yacoub (a1), Ian Hall (a2) and Jane Bernal (a3)
Extract

Medium-secure care services developed in England following the Butler report (Home Office & Department of Health and Social Security, 1975). They were established to address the major gap in provision between high-secure and local mental health services. However, the development of special secure services for offenders with a learning disability has largely been neglected (Snowden, 1995). People with learning disability who require secure in-patient care are often placed in remote and costly units because suitable local facilities do not exist. Such placements do not usually accord with user and carer wishes.

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Copyright
This is an Open Access article, distributed under the terms of the Creative Commons Attribution (CC-BY) license (http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by/4.0/), which permits unrestricted re-use, distribution, and reproduction in any medium, provided the original work is properly cited.
References
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BJPsych Bulletin
  • ISSN: 0955-6036
  • EISSN: 1472-1473
  • URL: /core/journals/bjpsych-bulletin
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Secure in-patient services for people with learning disability: is the market serving the user well?

  • Evan Yacoub (a1), Ian Hall (a2) and Jane Bernal (a3)
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