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Social inclusion and mental health

  • Liz Sayce (a1)
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Abstract
Copyright
This is an Open Access article, distributed under the terms of the Creative Commons Attribution (CC-BY) license (http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by/4.0/), which permits unrestricted re-use, distribution, and reproduction in any medium, provided the original work is properly cited.
References
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Deegan, P. (1994) The lived experience of rehabilitation. In The Experience of Recovery (eds Spaniol, L. & Koehler, M.), pp. 5459. Boston, MA: Rehabilitation.
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Link, B. G., Struening, E. L., Rahav, M. et al (1997) On stigma and its consequences: evidence from a longitudinal study of men with dual diagnoses of mental illness and substance abuse. Journal of Health and Behaviour, 38, 177190.
LABOUR FORCE SURVEY (1999). Department for Education and Employment: London.
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O'DONOGHUE, D. (1994) Breaking Down Barriers. The Stigma of Mental Illness: A User's Point of View. Aberystwyth: US All Wales User Network.
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Prior, C. (2000) Recovering a meaningful life is possible. Psychiatric Bulletin, 24, 30.
Read, J. & Baker, S. (1996) Not Just Sticks and Stones. A Survey of the Stigma, Taboos and Discrimination Experienced by People with Mental Health Problems. London: Mind.
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Sayce, L. (2000) From Psychiatric Patient to Citizen: Overcoming Discrimination and Social Exclusion. London: Macmillan.
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Sayce, L. & Perkins, R. (2000) Recovery beyond mere survival. Psychiatric Bulletin, 24, 74.
Social Exclusion Unit (1999) Bridging the Gap. New Opportunities for Young People aged 16–18 not in Education, Training or Employment. London: The Stationery Office.
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BJPsych Bulletin
  • ISSN: 0955-6036
  • EISSN: 1472-1473
  • URL: /core/journals/bjpsych-bulletin
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Social inclusion and mental health

  • Liz Sayce (a1)
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