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Support workers' attitudes to mental illness: implications for reducing stigma

  • Rfebecca Tipper (a1), Deborah Mountain (a2), Stuart Lorimer (a3) and Andrew McIntosh (a2)
Abstract
Aims and Method

We conducted an anonymous survey of support workers to examine attitudes to people with different types of mental illness. Scores were based on a previously demonstrated stigmatisation score.

Results

A total of 133 questionnaires were returned, representing 27% of all possible recipients. Fewer than 20% of respondents considered people with schizophrenia to be dangerous, although nearly half thought that they would never fully recover. More stigmatising responses were demonstrated to alcohol and drug addiction than to other disorders.

Clinical Implications

Support workers who spend large amounts of time with people with mental illness, in particular schizophrenia, have a low perception of their dangerousness. This may have implications for planning further measures to reduce stigmatisation.

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Copyright
This is an Open Access article, distributed under the terms of the Creative Commons Attribution (CC-BY) license (http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by/4.0/), which permits unrestricted re-use, distribution, and reproduction in any medium, provided the original work is properly cited.
References
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BJPsych Bulletin
  • ISSN: 0955-6036
  • EISSN: 1472-1473
  • URL: /core/journals/bjpsych-bulletin
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Support workers' attitudes to mental illness: implications for reducing stigma

  • Rfebecca Tipper (a1), Deborah Mountain (a2), Stuart Lorimer (a3) and Andrew McIntosh (a2)
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