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Surely you take complementary and alternative medicines?

  • Traolach Brugha (a1), Hagen Rampes (a2) and Rachel Jenkins (a3)
Abstract

A substantial proportion of our patients use or consider using complementary and alternative medicines (CAM) and other coping strategies. It is important that we acknowledge this, know something about the subject and are aware of current or potential developments in the field. These remedies might be harmless, beneficial or harmful and their side-effects might alter and confuse clinical presentations. We need to be vigilant of the potential for significant drug interactions between complementary and orthodox treatments. There is a substantial growth in complementary and alternative medical research in the USA, now beginning to follow in the UK. This will hopefully bring useful future progress.

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This is an Open Access article, distributed under the terms of the Creative Commons Attribution (CC-BY) license (http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by/4.0/), which permits unrestricted re-use, distribution, and reproduction in any medium, provided the original work is properly cited.
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BJPsych Bulletin
  • ISSN: 0955-6036
  • EISSN: 1472-1473
  • URL: /core/journals/bjpsych-bulletin
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Surely you take complementary and alternative medicines?

  • Traolach Brugha (a1), Hagen Rampes (a2) and Rachel Jenkins (a3)
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