Skip to main content
×
×
Home

Survey of specialised UK traumatic stress services

  • Jelena Jankovic Gavrilovic (a1), Patricia D'Ardenne (a2), Maria Bogic (a3), Nicoletta Capuzzo (a2) and Stefan Priebe (a4)...
Abstract
Aims and Method

The aim of the survey was to establish the organisational structure and practice of specialised services for post-traumatic stress in the UK. Questionnaires were collected from 17 specialised trauma services across the UK.

Results

Specialised trauma services use similar therapeutic programmes, but differ with respect to the characteristics of the treated clientele and organisational features. Although almost all services routinely measure outcome, some of the instruments used vary. There is no clear association between staff resources and number of patients treated.

Clinical Implications

Specialised traumatic stress services in the UK employ evidence-based treatment methods. A uniform protocol to measure outcome may help to establish a common UK-wide database on outcome of specialised treatment, and facilitate a reliable comparison between different service organisations and programmes. Organisational features should be considered to increase the efficiency of services.

  • View HTML
    • Send article to Kindle

      To send this article to your Kindle, first ensure no-reply@cambridge.org is added to your Approved Personal Document E-mail List under your Personal Document Settings on the Manage Your Content and Devices page of your Amazon account. Then enter the ‘name’ part of your Kindle email address below. Find out more about sending to your Kindle. Find out more about sending to your Kindle.

      Note you can select to send to either the @free.kindle.com or @kindle.com variations. ‘@free.kindle.com’ emails are free but can only be sent to your device when it is connected to wi-fi. ‘@kindle.com’ emails can be delivered even when you are not connected to wi-fi, but note that service fees apply.

      Find out more about the Kindle Personal Document Service.

      Survey of specialised UK traumatic stress services
      Available formats
      ×
      Send article to Dropbox

      To send this article to your Dropbox account, please select one or more formats and confirm that you agree to abide by our usage policies. If this is the first time you use this feature, you will be asked to authorise Cambridge Core to connect with your <service> account. Find out more about sending content to Dropbox.

      Survey of specialised UK traumatic stress services
      Available formats
      ×
      Send article to Google Drive

      To send this article to your Google Drive account, please select one or more formats and confirm that you agree to abide by our usage policies. If this is the first time you use this feature, you will be asked to authorise Cambridge Core to connect with your <service> account. Find out more about sending content to Google Drive.

      Survey of specialised UK traumatic stress services
      Available formats
      ×
Copyright
This is an Open Access article, distributed under the terms of the Creative Commons Attribution (CC-BY) license (http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by/4.0/), which permits unrestricted re-use, distribution, and reproduction in any medium, provided the original work is properly cited.
References
Hide All
Beck, A. & Steer, R. A. (1987) Manual for the Revised Beck Depression Inventory. San Antonio, TX: Psychological Corporation.
Beck, A. & Steer, R. A. (1988) Manual for the Beck Anxiety Inventory. San Antonio, TX: Psychological Corporation.
Beck, A.T., Steer, R. A. & Garbin, M. G. (1988) Psychometric propoerties of the Beck Depression Inventory: Twenty-five years of evaluation. Clinical Psychology Review, 8, 77100.
Berthold, S. M. (2000) War traumas and community violence: psychological, behavioral and academic outcomes among Khmer refugee adolescents. Journal of Multicultural Social Work, 8, 1546.
Blake, D. D., Weathers, F. W., Nagy, L. M., et al (1996) Clinician-Administered PTSD Scale for DSM–IV: Current and Life time Diagnostic Version. Boston: National Center for Posttraumatic Stress Disorder.
D'Ardenne, P., Capuzzo, N., Fakhoury, F., et al (2005) Subjective quality of life and posttraumatic stress disorder. Journal of Nervous and Mental Disease, 193, 6265.
Evans, C., Mellor-Clark, J., Margison, F., et al (2000) CORE: Clinical Outcomes in Routine Evaluation. Journal of Mental Health, 9, 247255.
First, M. B., Spitzer, R. L., Gibbon, M., et al (2002) Structured Clinical Interview for DSM–IV–TR Axis I Disorders. New York: Biometrics Research.
Foa, E. B., Cashman, L., Jaycox, L., et al (1997) The validation of a self-report measure of posttraumatic stress disorder: The Posttraumatic Diagnostic Scale. Psychological Assessment, 9, 445451.
Goldberg, D. & Hillier, V. F. (1979) A scaled version of the General Health Questionnaire. Psychological Medicine, 9, 139145.
Hamilton, M. (1967) Development of a rating scale for primary depressive illness. British Journal of Social and Clinical Psychology, 6, 278296.
Horowitz, M., Wilner, M. & Alvarez, W. (1979) Impact of Event Scale: A measure of subjective stress. Psychosomatic Medicine, 41, 209218.
Howard, M. R. & Hodes, M. (2000) Psychopathology, adversity and service utilization of young refugees. Journal of the American Academy of Child and Adolescent Psychiatry, 39, 368377.
National Collaborating Centre for Mental Health (2005) Post-Traumatic Stress Disorder. The Management of PTSD in Adults and Children in Primary and Secondary Care. London and Leicester: Gaskell and the British Psychological Society.
Porter, M. & Haslam, N. (2001) Forced displacement in Yugoslavia: a meta-analysis of psychological consequences and their moderators. Journal of Traumatic Stress, 14, 817834.
Sherman, J. L. (1998) Effect of psychotherapeutic treatments for PTSD: a meta-analysis of controlled clinical trials. Journal of Traumatic Stress, 11, 413435.
UK Trauma Group (2004) UK Services. http://www.uktrauma.org.uk/ukservcs.html
Van Etten, M. L. & Taylor, S. (1998) Comparative efficacy of treatments for post-traumatic stress disorder: a meta-analysis. Clinical Psychology and Psychotherapy, 5, 126144.
Weiss, D. & Marmar, C. (1997) The Impact of Event Scale – Revised. In Assessing Psychological Trauma and PTSD (eds Wilson, J. & Keane, T.). New York: Guilford.
Recommend this journal

Email your librarian or administrator to recommend adding this journal to your organisation's collection.

BJPsych Bulletin
  • ISSN: 0955-6036
  • EISSN: 1472-1473
  • URL: /core/journals/bjpsych-bulletin
Please enter your name
Please enter a valid email address
Who would you like to send this to? *
×

Metrics

Full text views

Total number of HTML views: 0
Total number of PDF views: 4 *
Loading metrics...

Abstract views

Total abstract views: 15 *
Loading metrics...

* Views captured on Cambridge Core between 2nd January 2018 - 22nd July 2018. This data will be updated every 24 hours.

Survey of specialised UK traumatic stress services

  • Jelena Jankovic Gavrilovic (a1), Patricia D'Ardenne (a2), Maria Bogic (a3), Nicoletta Capuzzo (a2) and Stefan Priebe (a4)...
Submit a response

eLetters

No eLetters have been published for this article.

×

Reply to: Submit a response


Your details


Conflicting interests

Do you have any conflicting interests? *