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Taking the path less trodden: UK psychiatrists working in low- and middle-income countries

  • Helen McColl (a1), Rebecca Syed Sheriff (a2) and Charlotte Hanlon (a3)
Summary

UK-based psychiatrists have the opportunity to work in low- and middle-income countries. the political climate is supportive, as evidenced by the recent Crisp report on ‘Global Health Partnerships: the UK Contribution to Health in Developing Countries’, and the Royal College of Psychiatrists volunteer scheme. However, many psychiatrists are unaware of ways in which they might contribute. In this article, we give examples of the diverse ways in which UK-based psychiatrists are already engaged in collaborative work overseas. We discuss some of the mutual benefits that such partnerships can bring and highlight the under-recognised benefits to the UK, both to the individual and to the National Health Service.

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Copyright
This is an Open Access article, distributed under the terms of the Creative Commons Attribution (CC-BY) license (http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by/4.0/), which permits unrestricted re-use, distribution, and reproduction in any medium, provided the original work is properly cited.
References
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BJPsych Bulletin
  • ISSN: 0955-6036
  • EISSN: 1472-1473
  • URL: /core/journals/bjpsych-bulletin
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Taking the path less trodden: UK psychiatrists working in low- and middle-income countries

  • Helen McColl (a1), Rebecca Syed Sheriff (a2) and Charlotte Hanlon (a3)
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