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Virtual Interviews for Students Interacting Online for Psychiatry (VISIOn): a novel resource for learning clinical interview skills

  • Brian Fitzmaurice (a1), Katie Armstrong (a2), Valerie Carroll (a3), Declan Dagger (a4) and Michael Gill (a5)...
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Academic psychiatry departments have two principle roles within undergraduate medical education. The first is to increase knowledge about psychological and psychiatric disorders and their treatments. The second is to help students develop the clinical skills to sensitively, effectively and accurately interview patients with psychological problems (General Medical Council, 1993) and to assess the mental states of patients.

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References
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Association of American Medical Colleges (1999) Medical School Objectives Project, Report III. Contemporary Issues in Medicine: Communication in Medicine. Association of American Medical Colleges.
Barrows, H. (1993) An overview of the uses of standardized patients for teaching and evaluating clinical skills. Academic Medicine, 68, 443451.
Department of Health and Children (2003) Report of the Inspector of Mental Hospitals. Department of Health & Children.
General Medical Council (1993) Tomorrow's Doctors. General Medical Council.
Maguire, P., Fairburn, S. & Fletcher, C. (1986) Consultation skills of young doctors – I – Benefits of feedback training in interviewing as students persist. BMJ, 293, 26.
Nilsen, S. & Baerheim, A., (2005) Feedback on video recorded consultations in medical teaching: why students loathe and love it – a focus group based qualitative study. BMC Medical Education, 5, 28.
Vassilas, C. & Ho, L. (2000) Video for teaching purposes. Advances in Psychiatric Treatment, 6, 304311.
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BJPsych Bulletin
  • ISSN: 0955-6036
  • EISSN: 1472-1473
  • URL: /core/journals/bjpsych-bulletin
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Virtual Interviews for Students Interacting Online for Psychiatry (VISIOn): a novel resource for learning clinical interview skills

  • Brian Fitzmaurice (a1), Katie Armstrong (a2), Valerie Carroll (a3), Declan Dagger (a4) and Michael Gill (a5)...
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eLetters

Online Psychiatric Teaching for Developing Countries

Prof.K.A.L.A. Kuruppuarachchi MD,FRCPsych(UK), Professor of Psychiatry
17 October 2007

Brian Fitzmaurice et al (Psychiatric Bulletin, June 2007, 31,218-220) highlight an important area in medical education, which is also relevant to psychiatric education in many developing countries.Even though the morbidity due to psychiatric illnesses is very high, there is a scarcity of qualified trainers in our part of the world. Small group teaching is encouraged in many medical schools. However, it is difficult toachieve this objective due to various reasons such as lack of an adequate number of trained teachers. For instance, in Kelaniya Medical School in Sri Lanka, a clinical group consists of about twenty medical students per patient. This obviously hinders learning opportunities, particularly clinical skills. Lack of other facilities will add to the problem.

At present, most of the patients in the Eastern cultures comply with the requests of doctors and medical students with few questions. However, as they become more aware of their rights, there is a possibility that they may be less willing to engage in such interviews. And this is already happening in some developing countries.

It is interesting to note that the aim of the video interviews was to enable medical students to be more prepared before commencing the clinical attachments. If the students are prepared for real life interviews this will have an impact on how they relate to patients in the live situation. Patients in turn will also feel more at ease.

It has been demonstrated that the attitude of medical students towards psychiatry improves after the psychiatry attachments and the direct involvement of patients is an important contributor to this (McParland et al, 2003).

The importance of improving the quality of undergraduate teaching in order to enhance the recruitment of medical graduates to psychiatry has also been emphasised (Sierles F.S. et al, 2003) and Virtual Interviews for Students Interacting Online for Psychiatry (VISIOn) will greatly assist in achieving this objective.

Medical teachers in developing countries too should think about incorporating online teaching and clinical interview skill training programmes in psychiatry as many medical schools have access to online teaching facilities. It may be feasible and cost effective even in resource poor countries.

ReferencesFitzmaurice, B., Armstrong, K., Carroll,V. et al (2007) Virtual Interviewsfor Students Interacting Online for Psychiatry (VISIOn): a novel resource for learning clinical interview skills. Psychiatry Bulletin , 31:218-220.McParland, M., Noble, L.M., Livingston, G., et al (2003) The effect of a psychiatric attachment on students attitude to and intention to pursue psychiatry as a carrier. Medical Education , 37, 447.Sierles, F.S. Yager, J. Weissman,S.H.(2003) Recruitment of U.S. Medical Graduates into Psychiatry ; Reasons for Optimism, Sources of Concern. Academic Psychiatry 27 : 252-259.
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