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What impact do undergraduate experiences have upon recruitment into psychiatry?

  • John M. Eagles (a1), Sam Wilson (a2), Jane M. Murdoch (a3) and Tom Brown (a4)
Extract

The Scottish Division of the Royal College of Psychiatrists conducted a survey of members and fellows in 2003 on recruitment and retention within psychiatry. Responses relating to retirement intentions of consultants have been published previously (Eagles et al, 2005). Respondents were asked to give views about improving recruitment, and by far the most common suggestion was that this could be achieved by enhancing undergraduate teaching in psychiatry. This paper will discuss the ways in which undergraduate experiences may have an impact upon recruitment.

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This is an Open Access article, distributed under the terms of the Creative Commons Attribution (CC-BY) license (http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by/4.0/), which permits unrestricted re-use, distribution, and reproduction in any medium, provided the original work is properly cited.
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What impact do undergraduate experiences have upon recruitment into psychiatry?

  • John M. Eagles (a1), Sam Wilson (a2), Jane M. Murdoch (a3) and Tom Brown (a4)
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eLetters

Lifestyle Trends Influencing Career Choice.

Sarabjeet Kohli, Senior House Officer, General Adult Psychiatry, Walsall Teaching Primary Care Trust.
16 February 2007

Given the recent trend in lifestyle choices dictating the choice of specialty,there is a general misconception amongst new graduates of Psychiatry being a soft specialty and is now being looked at as either a back-up plan for graduates unable to get onto the GP-VTS training scheme or as a stepping stone towards GP training. All this is fine but if it means that graduates with a genuine interest in the specialty are unable to get into a proper training programme or the recruitment of junior medical staff with a questionable scope for retention would be a waste of resources and a real shame.With the Modernising Medical Careers initiative the short listing questions make an effort to judge one’s commitment and interest in Psychiatry as a career choice but on the flip side, the restriction of applying to a limited number of specialties within a given deanery would encourage graduates with no interest in the specialty to take up Psychiatry as an alternate career choice which would make unhappy Consultants of the future or cause havoc at the next year in training whenquite a few of these trainees change over to General practice having got one year at SHO level training.All these factors should be considered before selection into the ST training programme and reflect a positive outcome at selection stages. ... More

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