Skip to main content
×
×
Home

What is the role of a community forensic mental health team?

  • Trevor Turner and Mark Salter (a1)
  • View HTML
    • Send article to Kindle

      To send this article to your Kindle, first ensure no-reply@cambridge.org is added to your Approved Personal Document E-mail List under your Personal Document Settings on the Manage Your Content and Devices page of your Amazon account. Then enter the ‘name’ part of your Kindle email address below. Find out more about sending to your Kindle. Find out more about sending to your Kindle.

      Note you can select to send to either the @free.kindle.com or @kindle.com variations. ‘@free.kindle.com’ emails are free but can only be sent to your device when it is connected to wi-fi. ‘@kindle.com’ emails can be delivered even when you are not connected to wi-fi, but note that service fees apply.

      Find out more about the Kindle Personal Document Service.

      What is the role of a community forensic mental health team?
      Available formats
      ×
      Send article to Dropbox

      To send this article to your Dropbox account, please select one or more formats and confirm that you agree to abide by our usage policies. If this is the first time you use this feature, you will be asked to authorise Cambridge Core to connect with your <service> account. Find out more about sending content to Dropbox.

      What is the role of a community forensic mental health team?
      Available formats
      ×
      Send article to Google Drive

      To send this article to your Google Drive account, please select one or more formats and confirm that you agree to abide by our usage policies. If this is the first time you use this feature, you will be asked to authorise Cambridge Core to connect with your <service> account. Find out more about sending content to Google Drive.

      What is the role of a community forensic mental health team?
      Available formats
      ×
Abstract
Copyright
This is an Open Access article, distributed under the terms of the Creative Commons Attribution (CC-BY) license (http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by/4.0/), which permits unrestricted re-use, distribution, and reproduction in any medium, provided the original work is properly cited.
Recommend this journal

Email your librarian or administrator to recommend adding this journal to your organisation's collection.

BJPsych Bulletin
  • ISSN: 0955-6036
  • EISSN: 1472-1473
  • URL: /core/journals/bjpsych-bulletin
Please enter your name
Please enter a valid email address
Who would you like to send this to? *
×

Metrics

Full text views

Total number of HTML views: 1
Total number of PDF views: 7 *
Loading metrics...

Abstract views

Total abstract views: 34 *
Loading metrics...

* Views captured on Cambridge Core between 2nd January 2018 - 22nd July 2018. This data will be updated every 24 hours.

What is the role of a community forensic mental health team?

  • Trevor Turner and Mark Salter (a1)
Submit a response

eLetters

Specialist Community Forensic Teams: costly or cost-effective?

Satinder Singh Sahota
13 October 2005

Turner’s correspondence (Psychiatric Bulletin September 2005, 29: 352) highlighted an important and emerging debate on the ideal management of forensic patients in the community. Turner argues that many of the patients in specialist services, such as the ‘stable restricted patients’ and ‘historically established criminals’, can be managed in generic teams as they no longer pose the same risks. Furthermore, some of the expert skills in specialist teams, such as correct use of HCR-20, could also be done by generic teams. If this proves to be the case then this negates the need for a specialist team, because as Turner points out specialist teams are an expensive resource for ‘looking after’ this client group.

The current service situation has emerged from the recommendations ofthe Reed Report in 1992. This document highlighted the inadequate serviceprovision for forensic patients in the community, following release from institutional care. Although the report did recommend further service provision and it described its ideal characteristics, the assumption was that either a generic or specialist team could meet these requirements (Reed Report 1992). This opinion was based on the state of services at that time and not on any trial data. Subsequently, specialist services developed to meet these non-evidence based requirements.

A recent survey of community forensic teams in England and Wales identified 37 teams, 26 of which responded via postal questionnaire (Judge2004). The survey found wide variability in the structure and delivery ofthese teams: 80% operated a service ‘parallel’ to generic services and 16 % were fully integrated to local services; number of CPN’s varied from 1 to 10; individual case-loads varied from 6 to 24. All teams did, however,offer case management and risk assessment.

Evaluating community services is difficult as convoluted care pathways direct patients to several services in a short period of time. In research, this invalidates the comparison of services as patient data co-contributes to both arms and this is precisely the difficulty I have encountered in my research (currently in process) comparing a specialist community forensic team with a generic team.

There is an urgent need for a long-term, prospective outcome study comparing generic and specialist forensic services (randomisation is also desirable but it is not realistic in forensics). Until such data are available, we can only assume a specialist team with a greater level of expertise, skill mix and knowledge produces better patient outcomes.

References

Reed, J. (1992) Review of Health and Social Services For Mentally Disordered Offenders and others requiring similar services. 45-63 Department of Health, London: HMSO

Judge, J., Harty, M-A. & Fahy, T. (2004) Survey of Community Forensic Psychiatry Services in England and Wales. The Journal of Forensic Psychiatry & Psychology. 15: 2. 244-253
... More

Conflict of interest: None Declared

Write a reply

×

Reply to: Submit a response


Your details


Conflicting interests

Do you have any conflicting interests? *