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The Young People's Unit, Macclesfield – a senior registrar's training experience

Published online by Cambridge University Press:  02 January 2018

Alison Wood*
Affiliation:
Child and Adolescent Psychiatry, Royal Manchester Children's Hospital, Manchester M27 1HA
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As a senior registrar training in child and adolescent psychiatry I am preparing for an uncertain future. In addition to essential clinical and management skills, the ability to withstand stress and burnout seems crucial. I should like to write about my experience of working as a senior registrar at the Young People's Unit (YPU) Macclesfield which is a specialist adolescent unit under chronic threat of closure.

Type
Trainees' forum
Creative Commons
Creative Common License - CCCreative Common License - BY
This is an Open Access article, distributed under the terms of the Creative Commons Attribution (CC-BY) license (http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by/4.0/), which permits unrestricted re-use, distribution, and reproduction in any medium, provided the original work is properly cited.
Copyright
Copyright © Royal College of Psychiatrists, 1992

References

Adams, S. (1991) Prescribing of psychotropic drugs to children and adolescents. British Medical Journal, 302, 217.Google Scholar
Dolan, B. & Norton, L. (1990) Is there a need to safeguard specialist psychiatric units in the NHS? The Henderson Hospital: a case in point. Psychiatric Bulletin 14, 7276.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
Wells, P. & Farragher, B. (1992) In-patient treatment of adolescents with emotional and conduct disorders: a study of outcome for 165 teenagers. British Journal of Psychiatry (in press).Google Scholar
Wilkinson, G. (1988) I don't want you to see a psychiatrist. British Medical Journal, 297, 11441145.Google Scholar
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