Skip to main content Accessibility help
×
Home

Article contents

Progression to AIDS, a clinical AIDS condition and mortality: psychosocial and physiological predictors

Published online by Cambridge University Press:  26 September 2002

J. LESERMAN
Affiliation:
From the Departments of Psychiatry, Medicine and Pathology and Laboratory Medicine, University of North Carolina School of Medicine, and School of Nursing, University of North Carolina, Chapel Hill, North Carolina; Departments of Psychiatry, Neuroscience and Pharmacology, University of Florida College of Medicine, Gainesville, Florida; and Departments of Psychiatry, Medicine and Neuroscience, University of Pennsylvania School of Medicine, Philadelphia, Pennsylvania, USA
J. M. PETITTO
Affiliation:
From the Departments of Psychiatry, Medicine and Pathology and Laboratory Medicine, University of North Carolina School of Medicine, and School of Nursing, University of North Carolina, Chapel Hill, North Carolina; Departments of Psychiatry, Neuroscience and Pharmacology, University of Florida College of Medicine, Gainesville, Florida; and Departments of Psychiatry, Medicine and Neuroscience, University of Pennsylvania School of Medicine, Philadelphia, Pennsylvania, USA
H. GU
Affiliation:
From the Departments of Psychiatry, Medicine and Pathology and Laboratory Medicine, University of North Carolina School of Medicine, and School of Nursing, University of North Carolina, Chapel Hill, North Carolina; Departments of Psychiatry, Neuroscience and Pharmacology, University of Florida College of Medicine, Gainesville, Florida; and Departments of Psychiatry, Medicine and Neuroscience, University of Pennsylvania School of Medicine, Philadelphia, Pennsylvania, USA
B. N. GAYNES
Affiliation:
From the Departments of Psychiatry, Medicine and Pathology and Laboratory Medicine, University of North Carolina School of Medicine, and School of Nursing, University of North Carolina, Chapel Hill, North Carolina; Departments of Psychiatry, Neuroscience and Pharmacology, University of Florida College of Medicine, Gainesville, Florida; and Departments of Psychiatry, Medicine and Neuroscience, University of Pennsylvania School of Medicine, Philadelphia, Pennsylvania, USA
J. BARROSO
Affiliation:
From the Departments of Psychiatry, Medicine and Pathology and Laboratory Medicine, University of North Carolina School of Medicine, and School of Nursing, University of North Carolina, Chapel Hill, North Carolina; Departments of Psychiatry, Neuroscience and Pharmacology, University of Florida College of Medicine, Gainesville, Florida; and Departments of Psychiatry, Medicine and Neuroscience, University of Pennsylvania School of Medicine, Philadelphia, Pennsylvania, USA
R. N. GOLDEN
Affiliation:
From the Departments of Psychiatry, Medicine and Pathology and Laboratory Medicine, University of North Carolina School of Medicine, and School of Nursing, University of North Carolina, Chapel Hill, North Carolina; Departments of Psychiatry, Neuroscience and Pharmacology, University of Florida College of Medicine, Gainesville, Florida; and Departments of Psychiatry, Medicine and Neuroscience, University of Pennsylvania School of Medicine, Philadelphia, Pennsylvania, USA
D. O. PERKINS
Affiliation:
From the Departments of Psychiatry, Medicine and Pathology and Laboratory Medicine, University of North Carolina School of Medicine, and School of Nursing, University of North Carolina, Chapel Hill, North Carolina; Departments of Psychiatry, Neuroscience and Pharmacology, University of Florida College of Medicine, Gainesville, Florida; and Departments of Psychiatry, Medicine and Neuroscience, University of Pennsylvania School of Medicine, Philadelphia, Pennsylvania, USA
J. D. FOLDS
Affiliation:
From the Departments of Psychiatry, Medicine and Pathology and Laboratory Medicine, University of North Carolina School of Medicine, and School of Nursing, University of North Carolina, Chapel Hill, North Carolina; Departments of Psychiatry, Neuroscience and Pharmacology, University of Florida College of Medicine, Gainesville, Florida; and Departments of Psychiatry, Medicine and Neuroscience, University of Pennsylvania School of Medicine, Philadelphia, Pennsylvania, USA
D. L. EVANS
Affiliation:
From the Departments of Psychiatry, Medicine and Pathology and Laboratory Medicine, University of North Carolina School of Medicine, and School of Nursing, University of North Carolina, Chapel Hill, North Carolina; Departments of Psychiatry, Neuroscience and Pharmacology, University of Florida College of Medicine, Gainesville, Florida; and Departments of Psychiatry, Medicine and Neuroscience, University of Pennsylvania School of Medicine, Philadelphia, Pennsylvania, USA

Abstract

Background. The primary aim of this study is to examine prospectively the association of stressful life events, social support, depressive symptoms, anger, serum cortisol and lymphocyte subsets with changes in multiple measures of human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) disease progression.

Methods. Ninety-six HIV-infected gay men without symptoms or anti-retroviral medication use at baseline were studied every 6 months for up to 9 years. Disease progression was defined in three ways using the Centers for Disease Control (CDC) classifications (e.g. AIDS, clinical AIDS condition and mortality). Cox regression models with time-dependent covariates were used, adjusting for control variables (e.g. race, age, baseline, CD4 T cells and viral load, number of anti-retroviral medications).

Results. Higher cumulative average stressful life events and lower cumulative average social support predicted faster progression to both the CDC AIDS classification and a clinical AIDS condition. Higher anger scores and CD8 T cells were associated with faster progression to AIDS, and depressive symptoms were associated with faster development of an AIDS clinical condition. Higher levels of serum cortisol predicted all three measures of disease progression.

Conclusions. These results suggest that stressful life events, dysphoric mood and limited social support are associated with more rapid clinical progression in HIV infection, with serum cortisol also exerting an independent effect on disease progression.

Type
Research Article
Copyright
© 2002 Cambridge University Press

Access options

Get access to the full version of this content by using one of the access options below.

Altmetric attention score

Full text views

Full text views reflects PDF downloads, PDFs sent to Google Drive, Dropbox and Kindle and HTML full text views.

Total number of HTML views: 0
Total number of PDF views: 238 *
View data table for this chart

* Views captured on Cambridge Core between September 2016 - 17th January 2021. This data will be updated every 24 hours.

Hostname: page-component-77fc7d77f9-xz9qf Total loading time: 0.3 Render date: 2021-01-17T05:47:09.369Z Query parameters: { "hasAccess": "0", "openAccess": "0", "isLogged": "0", "lang": "en" } Feature Flags last update: Sun Jan 17 2021 04:53:35 GMT+0000 (Coordinated Universal Time) Feature Flags: { "metrics": true, "metricsAbstractViews": false, "peerReview": true, "crossMark": true, "comments": true, "relatedCommentaries": true, "subject": true, "clr": true, "languageSwitch": true, "figures": false, "newCiteModal": false, "shouldUseShareProductTool": true, "shouldUseHypothesis": true, "isUnsiloEnabled": true }

Send article to Kindle

To send this article to your Kindle, first ensure no-reply@cambridge.org is added to your Approved Personal Document E-mail List under your Personal Document Settings on the Manage Your Content and Devices page of your Amazon account. Then enter the ‘name’ part of your Kindle email address below. Find out more about sending to your Kindle. Find out more about sending to your Kindle.

Note you can select to send to either the @free.kindle.com or @kindle.com variations. ‘@free.kindle.com’ emails are free but can only be sent to your device when it is connected to wi-fi. ‘@kindle.com’ emails can be delivered even when you are not connected to wi-fi, but note that service fees apply.

Find out more about the Kindle Personal Document Service.

Progression to AIDS, a clinical AIDS condition and mortality: psychosocial and physiological predictors
Available formats
×

Send article to Dropbox

To send this article to your Dropbox account, please select one or more formats and confirm that you agree to abide by our usage policies. If this is the first time you use this feature, you will be asked to authorise Cambridge Core to connect with your <service> account. Find out more about sending content to Dropbox.

Progression to AIDS, a clinical AIDS condition and mortality: psychosocial and physiological predictors
Available formats
×

Send article to Google Drive

To send this article to your Google Drive account, please select one or more formats and confirm that you agree to abide by our usage policies. If this is the first time you use this feature, you will be asked to authorise Cambridge Core to connect with your <service> account. Find out more about sending content to Google Drive.

Progression to AIDS, a clinical AIDS condition and mortality: psychosocial and physiological predictors
Available formats
×
×

Reply to: Submit a response


Your details


Conflicting interests

Do you have any conflicting interests? *