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Dissolved inorganic Radiocarbon content of the Western Coral sea: Implications for Intermediate and Deep Water Circulation

Published online by Cambridge University Press:  21 November 2019

Aymeric PM Servettaz
Affiliation:
Laboratoire des Sciences du Climat et de l’Environnement (IPSL/CEA-CNRS-UVSQ UMR 8212), CEA Saclay, F-91190 Gif-sur-Yvette, France Atmosphere and Ocean Research Institute, The University of Tokyo, 5-1-5 Kashiwanoha, Kashiwa, Chiba 277-8564, Japan
Yusuke Yokoyama
Affiliation:
Atmosphere and Ocean Research Institute, The University of Tokyo, 5-1-5 Kashiwanoha, Kashiwa, Chiba 277-8564, Japan Department of Earth and Planetary Science, Graduate School of Science, The University of Tokyo, 7-3-1 Hongo, Bunkyo-ku, Tokyo 113-0033, Japan
Shoko Hirabayashi
Affiliation:
Atmosphere and Ocean Research Institute, The University of Tokyo, 5-1-5 Kashiwanoha, Kashiwa, Chiba 277-8564, Japan Department of Environmental Changes, Faculty of Social and Cultural Studies, Kyushu University, 744 Motooka, Nishi-ku, Fukuoka 819-0395, Japan
Markus Kienast
Affiliation:
Department of Oceanography, Dalhousie University, Halifax, Nova Scotia, B3H 4J1, Canada
Yosuke Miyairi
Affiliation:
Atmosphere and Ocean Research Institute, The University of Tokyo, 5-1-5 Kashiwanoha, Kashiwa, Chiba 277-8564, Japan
Mahyar Mohtadi
Affiliation:
MARUM-Center for Marine Environmental Sciences, University of Bremen, 28359 Bremen, Germany
Corresponding

Abstract

The South Pacific Ocean contributes to the global carbon cycle by exchanging CO2 between the atmosphere and intermediate to deep water masses. The path of the Antarctic Intermediate Water (AAIW) in the South Pacific gyre has been inferred from salinity, oxygen, and nutrient measurements, but radiocarbon (14C) measurements—a direct tracer of the carbon cycle—remain sparse. Here, we present the first radiocarbon profiles in the western Coral Sea and compare our measurements with South Pacific stations from GLODAPv2, a database of ocean hydrochemistry. Surface and subsurface waters in the Coral Sea cannot be attributed to a single source based on their Δ14C signatures, and we observe a penetration of bomb-produced 14C. AAIW in the western Coral Sea shows Δ14C values comparable to those in the South Pacific gyre, consistent with circulation of AAIW in the lower part of the southern equatorial current. The deep waters of the western Coral Sea have significantly higher 14C than the South Pacific at the same isopycnal, consistent with a northward intrusion of Circumpolar Deep Water from the Tasman Sea, along with a westward influx of deep waters from the Central Pacific. In accordance with silicate concentrations published previously, this shows the dual origin of deep waters in the Coral Sea.

Type
Conference Paper
Copyright
© 2019 by the Arizona Board of Regents on behalf of the University of Arizona 

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Footnotes

Selected Papers from the 23rd International Radiocarbon Conference, Trondheim, Norway, 17–22 June, 2018

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