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Carbon Dynamics in Vertisols as Revealed by High-Resolution Sampling

Published online by Cambridge University Press:  18 July 2016

Peter Becker-Heidmann
Affiliation:
Institut f. Bodenkunde, Allende-Platz 2, 20146 Hamburg, Germany
Olaf Andresen
Affiliation:
Institut f. Bodenkunde, Allende-Platz 2, 20146 Hamburg, Germany
Dov Kalmar
Affiliation:
The Volcani Center of Agricultural Research, Akko, Israel
Hans-Wilhelm Scharpenseel
Affiliation:
Institut f. Bodenkunde, Allende-Platz 2, 20146 Hamburg, Germany
Dan H Yaalon
Affiliation:
Institute of Earth Sciences, Hebrew University, Givat Ram Campus, Jerusalem 91904, Israel
Corresponding
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Abstract

Two Vertisol soil profiles under xeric soil moisture regimes, located at Qedma and Akko, Israel, were investigated and compared to a profile under ustic moisture regime, located in Hyderabad, India. Samples were taken in complete successive 2 cm thin layers down to about 180 cm depth or more. Organic and inorganic carbon were analyzed with regard to 13C and 14C concentrations. While all soils have radiocarbon ages of several thousand years BP, the depth distributions reveal substantial differences between the soil carbon dynamics. 14C and, less pronounced, δ13C clearly reflect the pedoturbation process. Further, its strength is found to be related to mainly soil moisture regime, then clay content and land use. In one soil, a change of growing from C4 to C3 crops in the past can be concluded from the δ13C depth distribution.

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Articles
Copyright
Copyright © 2002 by the Arizona Board of Regents on behalf of the University of Arizona 

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