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Distribution of 14C and 13C in Forest Soils of the Dinghushan Biosphere Reserve

Published online by Cambridge University Press:  18 July 2016

Chengde Shen
Affiliation:
Guangzhou Institute of Geochemistry, Chinese Academy of Sciences, Guangzhou 510640, China State Key Laboratory of Xi'an Loess and Quaternary, Chinese Academy of Sciences, Xi'an 710061, China
Weixi Yi
Affiliation:
Guangzhou Institute of Geochemistry, Chinese Academy of Sciences, Guangzhou 510640, China
Yanmin Sun
Affiliation:
Guangzhou Institute of Geochemistry, Chinese Academy of Sciences, Guangzhou 510640, China
Changping Xing
Affiliation:
Guangzhou Institute of Geochemistry, Chinese Academy of Sciences, Guangzhou 510640, China
Ying Yang
Affiliation:
Guangzhou Institute of Geochemistry, Chinese Academy of Sciences, Guangzhou 510640, China
Chao Yuan
Affiliation:
Guangzhou Institute of Geochemistry, Chinese Academy of Sciences, Guangzhou 510640, China
Zhian Li
Affiliation:
South China Institute of Botany, Chinese Academy of Sciences, Guangzhou 510650, China
Shaolin Peng
Affiliation:
South China Institute of Botany, Chinese Academy of Sciences, Guangzhou 510650, China
Zhisheng An
Affiliation:
State Key Laboratory of Xi'an Loess and Quaternary, Chinese Academy of Sciences, Xi'an 710061, China
Tungsheng Liu
Affiliation:
Guangzhou Institute of Geochemistry, Chinese Academy of Sciences, Guangzhou 510640, China
Corresponding
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Abstract

We report here first results on the bulk soil organic carbon (SOC), apparent radiocarbon ages and δ13C characteristics of the tropical and subtropical forest soil in Dinghushan Biosphere Reserve (DHSBR). The forest oxisol in Dinghushan has developed during the Holocene. The δ13C variation curves in all three profiles may be divided into two sections. The upper section from 0 to 40 cm has δ13C values varying from −27.4 to −24.1‰, −27.5 to −22.2‰, and −24.4 to −20.1‰. in the Wukesong, Qingyunsi and Kengkou profiles, respectively. The lower section, including the 40–160 cm horizons, has a uniform δ13C. The mean δ13C values of the soil organic carbon could be used not only to discriminate between C3 and C4 plants, but also to distinguish between coniferous and broad-leaf plants.

Type
I. Our ‘Dry’ Environment: Above Sea Level
Copyright
Copyright © 2001 by the Arizona Board of Regents on behalf of the University of Arizona 

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