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Applied Relaxation Training for Generalised Anxiety and Panic Attacks:

The Efficacy of a Learnt Coping Strategy on Subjective Reports

Published online by Cambridge University Press:  29 January 2018

Nicholas Tarrier*
Affiliation:
Salford District Psychology Department, Prestwich Hospital, Mancester M25 7BL
Chris Main
Affiliation:
Salford District Psychology Department, Prestwich Hospital, Mancester M25 7BL
*
Correspondence

Abstract

The results of applied relaxation training in patients with generalised anxiety and panic attacks are reported. ART was taught during one session, by means of participant demonstration, written instructions, taped instructions, or a combination of all three, with instructions to practise at home. All four methods proved superior to a waiting list control, but there were no differences between the treatment groups. There was some evidence for the non-specific effect of expectancy, but this did not completely explain the treatment effect.

Type
Papers
Copyright
Copyright © 1986 The Royal College of Psychiatrists 

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