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Brief scale for measuring the outcomes of emotional and behavioural disorders in children

Health of the Nation Outcome Scales for Children and Adolescents (HoNOSCA)

Published online by Cambridge University Press:  03 January 2018

Simon G. Gowers*
Affiliation:
University of Liverpool, Section of Adolescent Psychiatry, Pine Lodge, Chester
Richard C. Harrington
Affiliation:
University of Manchester, Section of Child and Adolescent Psychiatry, Royal Manchester Children's Hospital, Manchester
Anna Whitton
Affiliation:
University of Manchester, Section of Child and Adolescent Psychiatry, Royal Manchester Children's Hospital, Manchester
Paul Lelliott
Affiliation:
Royal College of Psychiatrists' Research Unit
Anne Beevor
Affiliation:
Royal College of Psychiatrists' Research Unit
John Wing
Affiliation:
Royal College of Psychiatrists' Research Unit
Robert Jezzard
Affiliation:
Department of Health, London
*
Professor S. G. Gowers, University of Liverpool, Section of Adolescent Psychiatry, Pine Lodge, 79 Liverpool Road, Chester CH2 IAW

Abstract

Background

Following the development of a child and adolescent version of the Health of the Nation Outcome Scales (HoNOSCA), field trials were conducted to assess their feasibility and acceptability in routine outcome measurement.

Aims

To evaluate the reliability, validity and acceptability of HoNOSCA in routine outcome measurement.

Method

Following training, 36 field sites provided ratings on 1276 cases at one time point and outcome data on 906. Acceptability was assessed by way of written feedback and at a debriefing meeting.

Results

HoNOSCA demonstrated satisfactory reliability and validity characteristics. It was sensitive to change and its ability to measure change accorded with the clinicians' independent rating. HoNOSCA was reasonably acceptable to clinicians' from a range of disciplines and services.

Conclusions

Provided that training needs can be met, HoNOSCA represents a satisfactory brief outcome measure which could be used routinely in child and adolescent mental health services.

Type
HoNOS Papers
Copyright
Copyright © 1999 The Royal College of Psychiatrists 

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Footnotes

Declaration of interest

Supported by a Department of Health grant.

References

Department of Health (1992) The Health of the Nation. A Strategy for Health. London: HMSO.Google Scholar
Hunter, J., Higginson, I & Garralda, E. (1994) Systematic literature review: Outcome measures for child and adolescent services. Journal of Public Health Medicine, 18, 197206.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
Jensen, P. S., Hoagwood, K. & Petti, T. (1996) Outcomes of mental health care for children and adolescents: II. Literature review and application of a comprehensive model. Journal of the American Academy of Child and Adolescent Psychiatry, 35, 10641077 CrossRefGoogle ScholarPubMed
Schaffer, D., Gould, M. S., Brasic, J., et al (1983) A Children's Global Assessment Scale (C-GAS). Archives of General Psychiatry, 40, 12281231.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
Wing, J. K., Curtis, R. H. & Beevor, A. S. (1996) HoNOS – Health of the Notion Outcome Scales: Report on Research and Development. London: Royal College of Psychiatrists Research Unit.Google Scholar
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