Skip to main content Accessibility help
×
Home
Hostname: page-component-dc8c957cd-v8rb6 Total loading time: 0.257 Render date: 2022-01-28T06:54:36.253Z Has data issue: true Feature Flags: { "shouldUseShareProductTool": true, "shouldUseHypothesis": true, "isUnsiloEnabled": true, "metricsAbstractViews": false, "figures": true, "newCiteModal": false, "newCitedByModal": true, "newEcommerce": true, "newUsageEvents": true }

Lethal Catatonia and Neuroleptic Malignant Syndrome

A Dopamine Receptor Shut-down Hypothesis

Published online by Cambridge University Press:  02 January 2018

Abdelkarim A. Osman*
Affiliation:
King Fahd Hospital, Jeddah, Saudi Arabia
Mohamed H. Khurasani
Affiliation:
King Fahd Hospital, Jeddah, Saudi Arabia
*
Dr Osman, PO Box 50505 (176), King Fahd Hospital, Jeddah, Saudi Arabia

Abstract

Background

Lethal catatonia and neuroleptic malignant syndrome (NMS) have been suggested to have a common neurochemical cause. We hypothesise that both conditions may be due to a sudden and massive blockade of dopamine neurotransmitters.

Method

NMS was diagnosed in psychotic in-patients treated with neuroleptics if four features were present: diffuse severe rigidity, altered level of consciousness, hyperpyrexia and autonomic instability.

Results

Over three years, five NMS cases were diagnosed. Two presented with catatonic features and were diagnosed as acute reactive psychosis. Their neuroleptic doses were small, arguing for a particular sensitivity in these two cases.

Conclusion

The sensitivity of two patients with catatonic features who developed NMS with small doses of neuroleptics supports a common neurochemical basis for the two conditions.

Type
Research Article
Copyright
Copyright © Royal College of Psychiatrists, 1994 

Access options

Get access to the full version of this content by using one of the access options below. (Log in options will check for institutional or personal access. Content may require purchase if you do not have access.)

References

Addonizio, G., Susman, V. L. & Roth, S. D. (1986) Symptoms of neuroleptic malignant syndrome in 82 consecutive inpatients. American Journal of Psychiatry, 143, 15871590.Google ScholarPubMed
Adityanjee, , Singh, S., Singh, G., et al (1988) Spectrum concept of neuroleptic malignant syndrome. British Journal of Psychiatry, 153, 107111.CrossRefGoogle ScholarPubMed
Caroff, S. N. (1980) The neuroleptic malignant syndrome. Journal of Clinical Psychiatry, 41, 7983.Google ScholarPubMed
Fujitake, J., Kuno, S. & Nishitani, H. (1984) Neuroleptic malignant syndrome-like state in eight patients with Parkinsonism. Rinsho Shinkeigaku, 24, 371378.Google Scholar
Kellam, A. M. P. (1987) The neuroleptic malignant syndrome, so-called: a survey of the world literature. British Journal of Psychiatry, 150, 752759.CrossRefGoogle ScholarPubMed
Kellam, A. M. P. (1990) The (frequently) neuroleptic malignant syndrome. Current Opinion in Psychiatry, 4, 3437.Google Scholar
Levenson, J. L. (1985) Neuroleptic malignant syndrome. American Journal of Psychiatry, 142, 11371145.Google ScholarPubMed
Mann, S. C., Caroff, S. N., Bleier, H. R., et al (1986) Lethal catatonia. American Journal of Psychiatry, 143, 13741381.Google ScholarPubMed
Osman, A., Al Khateeb, S. & Ali, A. (1993) The pattern of admission to Jeddah Psychiatric Hospital. Saudi Medical Journal, 14, 334339.Google Scholar
Rosebush, P. & Stewart, T. (1989) A prospective analysis of 24 episodes of neuroleptic malignant syndrome. American Journal of Psychiatry, 146, 717725.Google ScholarPubMed
Shalev, A. & Munitz, H. (1986) The neuroleptic malignant syndrome agent and host interaction. Acta Psychiatrica Scandinavica, 73, 337347.CrossRefGoogle ScholarPubMed
White, D. & Robins, A. H. (1991) Catatonia: harbinger of the neuroleptic malignant syndrome. British Journal of Psychiatry, 158, 419421.CrossRefGoogle ScholarPubMed
Submit a response

eLetters

No eLetters have been published for this article.
26
Cited by

Send article to Kindle

To send this article to your Kindle, first ensure no-reply@cambridge.org is added to your Approved Personal Document E-mail List under your Personal Document Settings on the Manage Your Content and Devices page of your Amazon account. Then enter the ‘name’ part of your Kindle email address below. Find out more about sending to your Kindle. Find out more about sending to your Kindle.

Note you can select to send to either the @free.kindle.com or @kindle.com variations. ‘@free.kindle.com’ emails are free but can only be sent to your device when it is connected to wi-fi. ‘@kindle.com’ emails can be delivered even when you are not connected to wi-fi, but note that service fees apply.

Find out more about the Kindle Personal Document Service.

Lethal Catatonia and Neuroleptic Malignant Syndrome
Available formats
×

Send article to Dropbox

To send this article to your Dropbox account, please select one or more formats and confirm that you agree to abide by our usage policies. If this is the first time you use this feature, you will be asked to authorise Cambridge Core to connect with your <service> account. Find out more about sending content to Dropbox.

Lethal Catatonia and Neuroleptic Malignant Syndrome
Available formats
×

Send article to Google Drive

To send this article to your Google Drive account, please select one or more formats and confirm that you agree to abide by our usage policies. If this is the first time you use this feature, you will be asked to authorise Cambridge Core to connect with your <service> account. Find out more about sending content to Google Drive.

Lethal Catatonia and Neuroleptic Malignant Syndrome
Available formats
×
×

Reply to: Submit a response

Please enter your response.

Your details

Please enter a valid email address.

Conflicting interests

Do you have any conflicting interests? *