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The Social Functioning Scale the Development and Validation of a New Scale of Social Adjustment for use in Family Intervention Programmes with Schizophrenic Patients

Published online by Cambridge University Press:  02 January 2018

Max Birchwood*
Affiliation:
District Psychology Department, All Saints' Hospital, Lodge Road, Winson Green, Birmingham B18 5SD
Jo Smith
Affiliation:
Department of Psychology, Barnsley Hall Hospital, Bromsgrove, Worcestershire
Ray Cochrane
Affiliation:
School of Psychology, University of Birmingham, Edgbaston, Birmingham B15 2TT
Sheila Wetton
Affiliation:
District Psychology Department, All Saints' Hospital, Lodge Road, Winson Green, Birmingham B18 5SD
Sonja Copestake
Affiliation:
District Psychology Department, All Saints' Hospital, Lodge Road, Winson Green, Birmingham B18 5SD
*
Correspondence

Abstract

Social functioning as an outcome variable in family interventions with schizophrenic patients has been a relatively neglected area. The requirements of a scale of social functioning to measure the efficacy of family interventions include: the measurement of skill/behaviour relevant to the impairments and the demography of this group; the ability to yield considerable information with an economy of clinical time; and the establishment of ‘comparative’ need through comparison between subscales and with appropriate reference groups. Results from three samples show that the Social Functioning Scale is reliable, valid, sensitive and responsive to change.

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Papers
Copyright
Copyright © The Royal College of Psychiatrists 

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