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Accuracy of proactive case finding for mental disorders by community informants in Nepal

  • Mark J. D. Jordans (a1), Brandon A. Kohrt (a2), Nagendra P. Luitel (a3), Ivan H. Komproe (a4) and Crick Lund (a5)...
Abstract
Background

Accurate detection of persons in need of mental healthcare is crucial to reduce the treatment gap between psychiatric burden and service use in low- and middle-income (LAMI) countries.

Aims

To evaluate the accuracy of a community-based proactive case-finding strategy (Community Informant Detection Tool, CIDT), involving pictorial vignettes, designed to initiate pathways for mental health treatment in primary care settings.

Method

Community informants using the CIDT identified screen positive (n = 110) and negative persons (n = 85). Participants were then administered the Composite International Diagnostic Interview (CIDI).

Results

The CIDT has a positive predictive value of 0.64 (0.68 for adults only) and a negative predictive value of 0.93 (0.91 for adults only).

Conclusions

The CIDT has promising detection properties for psychiatric caseness. Further research should investigate its potential to increase demand for, and access to, mental health services.

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Copyright
Corresponding author
Mark Jordans, PhD, Research and Development Department, HealthNet TPO, Lizzy Ansinghstraat 163, 1073 RG Amsterdam, The Netherlands. Email: mark.jordans@hntpo.org
Footnotes
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Declaration of interest

None.

Footnotes
References
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Accuracy of proactive case finding for mental disorders by community informants in Nepal

  • Mark J. D. Jordans (a1), Brandon A. Kohrt (a2), Nagendra P. Luitel (a3), Ivan H. Komproe (a4) and Crick Lund (a5)...
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