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Are we ready to use nature gardens to treat stress-related illnesses?

  • Peter A. Coventry and Piran C.L. White
Summary

In this issue, Stigsdotter et al show that nature gardens offer similar benefits to cognitive–behavioural therapy for managing stress-related illnesses among people on sick leave. There is scope for pragmatic trials to establish the processes involved and highlight the co-benefits that nature gardens offer for health and the environment.

Declaration of interest

None.

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Copyright
Corresponding author
Correspondence: Peter A. Coventry, Department of Health Sciences, Faculty of Science, ARRC Building, University of York, York YO10 5DD, UK. Email: peter.coventry@york.ac.uk
Footnotes
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See pp. 404–411, this issue.

Footnotes
References
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1Wiegner, L, Hange, D, Bjorkelund, C, Ahlborg, G. Jr Prevalence of perceived stress and associations to symptoms of exhaustion, depression and anxiety in a working age population seeking primary care--an observational study. BMC Fam Pract 2015; 16: 38.
2Arends, I, Bruinvels, DJ, Rebergen, DS, Nieuwenhuijsen, K, Madan, I, Neumeyer-Gromen, A, et al. Interventions to facilitate return to work in adults with adjustment disorders. Cochrane Database Syst Rev 2012; 12: CD006389.
3Naylor, C, Das, P, Ross, S, Honeyman, M, Thompson, J, Gilburt, H. Bringing Together Physical and Mental Health. A New Frontier for Integrated Care. King's Fund, 2016.
4Mitchell, R, Popham, F. Effect of exposure to natural environment on health inequalities: an observational population study. Lancet 2008; 372: 1655–60.
5Defra. A Green Future: Our 25-year Plan to Improve the Environment. HM Government, 2018.
6Bowler, DE, Buyung-Ali, LM, Knight, TM, Pullin, AS. A systematic review of evidence for the added benefits to health of exposure to natural environments. BMC Public Health 2010; 10: 456.
7Gidlow, CJ, Jones, MV, Hurst, G, Masterson, D, Clark-Carter, D, Tarvainen, MP, et al. Where to put your best foot forward: psycho-physiological responses to walking in natural and urban environments. J Environ Psychol 2016; 45: 22–9.
8Annerstedt, M, Wahrborg, P. Nature-assisted therapy: systematic review of controlled and observational studies. Scand Journal Public Health 2011; 39: 371–88.
9White, PC, Wyatt, J, Chalfont, G, Bland, JM, Neale, C, Trepel, D, et al. Exposure to nature gardens has time-dependent associations with mood improvements for people with mid- and late-stage dementia: innovative practice. Dementia (London) 2017: 1471301217723772.
10Butterfield, A, Martin, D. Affective sanctuaries: understanding Maggie's as therapeutic landscapes. Landscape Res 2016; 41: 695706.
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The British Journal of Psychiatry
  • ISSN: 0007-1250
  • EISSN: 1472-1465
  • URL: /core/journals/the-british-journal-of-psychiatry
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Are we ready to use nature gardens to treat stress-related illnesses?

  • Peter A. Coventry and Piran C.L. White
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