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Assessing the severity of borderline personality disorder

  • Paul Moran (a1) and Mike J. Crawford (a2)
Summary

The identification of a reliable and valid severity index for borderline personality disorder has vexed researchers for decades. A simple, clinically intuitive severity index for borderline personality disorder with predictive validity has now been identified. This index could usefully guide treatment planning, but other contextual factors should also determine the need for specialist treatment.

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Copyright
Corresponding author
Dr Paul Moran, PO28, David Goldberg Building, Institute of Psychiatry, King's College London, De Crespigny Park, London SE5 8AF, UK. Email: paul.moran@kcl.ac.uk
Footnotes
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See pp. 221–227, this issue.

Declaration of interest

P.M. has received honorarium payment from Roskilde University for speaking on the topic of personality disorder.

Footnotes
References
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The British Journal of Psychiatry
  • ISSN: 0007-1250
  • EISSN: 1472-1465
  • URL: /core/journals/the-british-journal-of-psychiatry
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Assessing the severity of borderline personality disorder

  • Paul Moran (a1) and Mike J. Crawford (a2)
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