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Befriending: active placebo or effective psychotherapy?

  • Douglas Turkington (a1), Helen Spencer (a2), Latoyah Lebert (a2) and Robert Dudley (a3)
Summary

Befriending allows for control of the non-specific factors of the therapist–patient interaction in psychosocial research. Manualised befriending is at the very least an active placebo and potentially an effective intervention. Befriending now merits increased research attention to determine indications for use and to elucidate mechanisms of action.

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Copyright
Corresponding author
Douglas Turkington, Wolfson Research Centre, Campus for Ageing and Vitality, Newcastle General Hospital, Westgate Road, Newcastle-upon-Tyne, NE4 9AQ, UK. Email: Douglas.Turkington@ntw.nhs.uk
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Declaration of interest

D.T., H.S., L.L. and R.D. have all received payment for delivering lectures and workshops on the subject of cognitive–behavioural therapy for the treatment of schizophrenia and other psychoses.

Footnotes
References
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The British Journal of Psychiatry
  • ISSN: 0007-1250
  • EISSN: 1472-1465
  • URL: /core/journals/the-british-journal-of-psychiatry
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Befriending: active placebo or effective psychotherapy?

  • Douglas Turkington (a1), Helen Spencer (a2), Latoyah Lebert (a2) and Robert Dudley (a3)
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