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Best practice when service users do not consent to sharing information with carers: National multimethod study

  • Mike Slade (a1), Vanessa Pinfold (a2), Joan Rapaport (a3), Sophie Bellringer (a4), Sube Banerjee (a4), Elizabeth Kuipers (a5) and Peter Huxley (a6)...
Abstract
Background

Service users with psychosis may not consent to sharing information with carers. However, carers require access to relevant information to support them in their role.

Aims

To inform clinical practice when service users withhold consent to share information with their carer.

Method

Study data were derived from a synthesis of policy review (n=91), national survey (n=595) and individual interviews (n=24).

Results

Key principles to guide information-sharing practices were identified. Service users highlighted confidentiality being guaranteed by consent processes. Carers suggested a ‘culture shift’ was required, with professionals trained to work with carers. Professionals emphasised mental capacity, professional judgement and the context of care. A best practice framework is proposed.

Conclusions

An important distinction is between general information, which can always be shared without consent, and personal information, which is new to the carer and where consent needs to be considered. Clinical judgement is central to balancing conflicting ethical imperatives in this area.

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Copyright
Corresponding author
Dr Mike Slade, Health Services Research Department, Box PO29, Institute of Psychiatry, King's College London, London SE5 8AF, UK. Tel: +44 (0)20 7848 0795; fax: +44 (0)20 7277 1462; email: m.slade@iop.kcl.ac.uk
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Declaration of interest

None.

Footnotes
References
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  • ISSN: 0007-1250
  • EISSN: 1472-1465
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Best practice when service users do not consent to sharing information with carers: National multimethod study

  • Mike Slade (a1), Vanessa Pinfold (a2), Joan Rapaport (a3), Sophie Bellringer (a4), Sube Banerjee (a4), Elizabeth Kuipers (a5) and Peter Huxley (a6)...
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