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Brief screening instrument for post-traumatic stress disorder

  • Chris R. Brewin (a1), Suzanna Rose (a2), Bernice Andrews (a3), John Green (a4), Philip Tata (a4), Chris McEvedy (a4), Stuart Turner (a5) and Edna B. Foa (a6)...
Abstract
Background

Brief screening instruments appear to be a viable way of detecting post-traumatic stress disorder (PTSD) but none has yet been adequately validated.

Aims

To test and cross-validate a brief instrumentthat is simple to administer and score.

Method

Forty-one survivors of a rai l crash were administered a questionnaire, followed by a structured clinical interview 1 week later.

Results

Excellent prediction of a PTSD diagnosis was provided by respondents endorsing at least six re-experiencing or arousal symptoms, in any combination. The findings were replicated on data from a previous study of 157 crime victims.

Conclusions

Performance of the new measure was equivalent to agreement achieved between two full clinical interviews.

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Copyright
Corresponding author
Chris R. Brewin, Subdepartment of Clinical Health Psychology, University College London, Gower Street, London WC1E 6BT, UK
Footnotes
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Declaration of interest

The study was funded by the NHSE London Regional Office (project no. RDC01702). The views and opinions expressed herein do not necessarily reflectthose ofthe NHSE (LRO) or the Department of Health.

Footnotes
References
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The British Journal of Psychiatry
  • ISSN: 0007-1250
  • EISSN: 1472-1465
  • URL: /core/journals/the-british-journal-of-psychiatry
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Brief screening instrument for post-traumatic stress disorder

  • Chris R. Brewin (a1), Suzanna Rose (a2), Bernice Andrews (a3), John Green (a4), Philip Tata (a4), Chris McEvedy (a4), Stuart Turner (a5) and Edna B. Foa (a6)...
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