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Changes in regional cerebral blood flow during acute electroconvulsive therapy in patients with depression: Positron emission tomographic study

  • Harumasa Takano (a1), Nobutaka Motohashi (a2), Takeshi Uema (a2), Kenichi Ogawa (a3), Takashi Ohnishi (a4), Masami Nishikawa (a4), Haruo Kashima (a5) and Hiroshi Matsuda (a6)...

Abstract

Background

Although electroconvulsive therapy (ECT) is widely used to treat psychiatric disorders such as depression, its precise neural mechanisms remain unknown.

Aims

To investigate the time course of changes in cerebral blood flow during acute ECT.

Method

Cerebral blood flow was quantified serially prior to, during and after acute ECT in six patients with depression under anaesthesia using [15O]H2O positron emission tomography (PET).

Results

Cerebral blood flow during ECT increased particularly in the basal ganglia, brain-stem, diencephalon, amygdala, vermis and the frontal, temporal and parietal cortices compared with that before ECT. The flow increased in the thalamus and decreased in the anterior cingulate and medial frontal cortex soon after ECT compared with that before ECT.

Conclusions

These results suggest a relationship between the centrencephalic system and seizure generalisation. Further, they suggest that some neural mechanisms of action of ECT are mediated via brain regions including the anterior cingulate and medial frontal cortex and thalamus.

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Copyright

Corresponding author

Dr N. Motohashi, Department of Neuropsychiatry, Interdisciplinary Graduate School of Medicine and Engineering, University of Yamanashi, 1110 Shimokato, Chuo City, Yamanashi 409-3898, Japan. Tel: +81 55 273 9847; fax: +8155 273 6765; email: motohashi@yamanashi.ac.jp

Footnotes

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Declaration of interest

None.

Funding detailed in Acknowledgements.

Footnotes

References

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Changes in regional cerebral blood flow during acute electroconvulsive therapy in patients with depression: Positron emission tomographic study

  • Harumasa Takano (a1), Nobutaka Motohashi (a2), Takeshi Uema (a2), Kenichi Ogawa (a3), Takashi Ohnishi (a4), Masami Nishikawa (a4), Haruo Kashima (a5) and Hiroshi Matsuda (a6)...

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Changes in regional cerebral blood flow during acute electroconvulsive therapy in patients with depression: Positron emission tomographic study

  • Harumasa Takano (a1), Nobutaka Motohashi (a2), Takeshi Uema (a2), Kenichi Ogawa (a3), Takashi Ohnishi (a4), Masami Nishikawa (a4), Haruo Kashima (a5) and Hiroshi Matsuda (a6)...
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