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Cognitive and neural processes in non-clinical auditory hallucinations

  • Emma Barkus (a1), John Stirling (a1), Richard Hopkins (a1), Shane McKie (a2) and Shôn Lewis (a3)...
Abstract
Background

The nosological status of auditory hallucinations in non-clinical samples is unclear

Aims

To investigate the functional neural basis of non-clinical hallucinations

Method

After selection from 1206 people, 68 participants of high, medium and low hallucination proneness completed a task designed to elicit verbal hallucinatory phenomena under conditions of stimulus degradation. Eight subjects who reported hearing a voice when none was present repeated the task during functional imaging

Results

During the signal detection task, the high hallucination-prone participants reported a voice to be present when it was not (false alarms) significantly more often than the average or low participants (P<0.03, d.f. =2). On functional magnetic resonance imaging, patterns of activation during these false alarms showed activation in the superior and middle temporal cortex (P<0.001)

Conclusions

Auditory hallucinatory experiences reported in non-clinical samples appear to be mediated by similar patterns of cerebral activation as found during hallucinations in schizophrenia

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Copyright
Corresponding author
Dr S. Lewis, Neuroscience and Psychiatry Unit, The University of Manchester, Stopford Building, Oxford Road, Manchester M13 9PT. Email: shon.lewis@manchester.ac.uk
Footnotes
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Declaration of interest

None.

Funding detailed in Acknowledgements.

Footnotes
References
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The British Journal of Psychiatry
  • ISSN: 0007-1250
  • EISSN: 1472-1465
  • URL: /core/journals/the-british-journal-of-psychiatry
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Cognitive and neural processes in non-clinical auditory hallucinations

  • Emma Barkus (a1), John Stirling (a1), Richard Hopkins (a1), Shane McKie (a2) and Shôn Lewis (a3)...
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