Skip to main content
×
×
Home

Cultural engagement and cognitive reserve: museum attendance and dementia incidence over a 10-year period

  • Daisy Fancourt (a1), Andrew Steptoe (a2) and Dorina Cadar (a3)
Summary

Theories of cognitive reserve, disuse syndrome and stress have suggested that activities that are mentally engaging, enjoyable and socially interactive could be protective against the development of dementia. Using data from the English Longitudinal Study of Ageing, this study shows that for adults aged 50 and older visiting museums every few months or more was associated with a lower incidence rate of dementia over a 10-year follow-up period compared with less-frequent visiting. This association was independent of demographics, socioeconomic status, health-related variables including sensory impairment, depression, vascular conditions and other forms of community engagement. Visiting museums may be a promising psychosocial activity to support the prevention of dementia.

Declaration of interest

None.

  • View HTML
    • Send article to Kindle

      To send this article to your Kindle, first ensure no-reply@cambridge.org is added to your Approved Personal Document E-mail List under your Personal Document Settings on the Manage Your Content and Devices page of your Amazon account. Then enter the ‘name’ part of your Kindle email address below. Find out more about sending to your Kindle. Find out more about sending to your Kindle.

      Note you can select to send to either the @free.kindle.com or @kindle.com variations. ‘@free.kindle.com’ emails are free but can only be sent to your device when it is connected to wi-fi. ‘@kindle.com’ emails can be delivered even when you are not connected to wi-fi, but note that service fees apply.

      Find out more about the Kindle Personal Document Service.

      Cultural engagement and cognitive reserve: museum attendance and dementia incidence over a 10-year period
      Available formats
      ×
      Send article to Dropbox

      To send this article to your Dropbox account, please select one or more formats and confirm that you agree to abide by our usage policies. If this is the first time you use this feature, you will be asked to authorise Cambridge Core to connect with your <service> account. Find out more about sending content to Dropbox.

      Cultural engagement and cognitive reserve: museum attendance and dementia incidence over a 10-year period
      Available formats
      ×
      Send article to Google Drive

      To send this article to your Google Drive account, please select one or more formats and confirm that you agree to abide by our usage policies. If this is the first time you use this feature, you will be asked to authorise Cambridge Core to connect with your <service> account. Find out more about sending content to Google Drive.

      Cultural engagement and cognitive reserve: museum attendance and dementia incidence over a 10-year period
      Available formats
      ×
Copyright
This is an Open Access article, distributed under the terms of the Creative Commons Attribution licence (http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by/4.0/), which permits unrestricted re-use, distribution, and reproduction in any medium, provided the original work is properly cited.
Corresponding author
Correspondence: Daisy Fancourt, Department of Behavioural Science and Health, University College London, 1–19 Torrington Place, London WC1E 7HB, UK. Email: d.fancourt@ucl.ac.uk
References
Hide All
1Wu, Y-T, Teale, J, Matthews, FE, Brayne, C, Woods, B, Clare, L. Lifestyle factors, cognitive reserve, and cognitive function: results from the Cognitive Function and Ageing Study Wales, a population-based cohort. Lancet 2016; 388: S114.
2Hultsch, DF, Hertzog, C, Small, BJ, Dixon, RA. Use it or lose it: engaged lifestyle as a buffer of cognitive decline in aging? Psychol Aging 1999; 14: 245–63.
3Ashby, FG, Isen, AM, Turken, AU. A neuropsychological theory of positive affect and its influence on cognition. Psychol Rev 1999; 106: 529–50.
4Allerhand, M, Gale, CR, Deary, IJ. The dynamic relationship between cognitive function and positive well-being in older people: a prospective study using the English Longitudinal Study of Aging. Psychol Aging 2014; 29: 306–18.
5Rafnsson, SB, Orrell, M, d'Orsi, E, Hogervorst, E, Steptoe, A. Loneliness, social integration, and incident dementia over 6 years: prospective findings from the english longitudinal study of ageing. J Gerontol B Psychol Sci Soc Sci 2017; June 27 (https://academic.oup.com/psychsocgerontology/advance-article/doi/10.1093/geronb/gbx087/3896175).
6Hankey, GJ. Public health interventions for decreasing dementia risk. JAMA Neurol 2018; 75: 1112.
7Wilson, RS, Bennett, DA, Bienias, JL, Aggarwal, NT, Mendes De Leon, CF, Morris, MC, et al. Cognitive activity and incident AD in a population-based sample of older persons. Neurology 2002; 59: 1910–4.
8Wang, H-X, Karp, A, Winblad, B, Fratiglioni, L. Late-life engagement in social and leisure activities is associated with a decreased risk of dementia: a longitudinal study from the Kungsholmen project. Am J Epidemiol 2002; 155: 1081–7.
9Camic, PM, Chatterjee, HJ. Museums and art galleries as partners for public health interventions. Perspect Public Health 2013; 133: 6671.
10Yates, LA, Ziser, S, Spector, A, Orrell, M. Cognitive leisure activities and future risk of cognitive impairment and dementia: systematic review and meta-analysis. Int Psychogeriatr 2016; 28: 1791–806.
11Camic, PM, Hulbert, S, Kimmel, J. Museum object handling: a health-promoting community-based activity for dementia care. J Health Psychol 2017; Jan 1 (Epub ahead of print).
12Steptoe, A, Breeze, E, Banks, J, Nazroo, J. Cohort profile: the english longitudinal study of ageing. Int J Epidemiol 2013; 42: 1640–8.
13Jorm, AF, Masaki, KH, Davis, DG, Hardman, J, Nelson, J, Markesbery, WR, et al. Memory complaints in nondemented men predict future pathologic diagnosis of Alzheimer disease. Neurology 2004; 63: 1960–1.
14Stern, Y. Cognitive reserve in ageing and Alzheimer's disease. Lancet Neurol 2012; 11: 1006–12.
15Hindle, JV, Hurt, CS, Burn, DJ, Brown, RG, Samuel, M, Wilson, KC, et al. The effects of cognitive reserve and lifestyle on cognition and dementia in Parkinson's disease – a longitudinal cohort study. Int J Geriatr Psychiatry 2016; 31: 1323.
Recommend this journal

Email your librarian or administrator to recommend adding this journal to your organisation's collection.

The British Journal of Psychiatry
  • ISSN: 0007-1250
  • EISSN: 1472-1465
  • URL: /core/journals/the-british-journal-of-psychiatry
Please enter your name
Please enter a valid email address
Who would you like to send this to? *
×

Keywords

Type Description Title
WORD
Supplementary materials

Fancourt et al. supplementary material
Tables S1-S3

 Word (33 KB)
33 KB

Metrics

Altmetric attention score

Full text views

Total number of HTML views: 51
Total number of PDF views: 158 *
Loading metrics...

Abstract views

Total abstract views: 739 *
Loading metrics...

* Views captured on Cambridge Core between 20th July 2018 - 18th August 2018. This data will be updated every 24 hours.

Cultural engagement and cognitive reserve: museum attendance and dementia incidence over a 10-year period

  • Daisy Fancourt (a1), Andrew Steptoe (a2) and Dorina Cadar (a3)
Submit a response

eLetters

No eLetters have been published for this article.

×

Reply to: Submit a response


Your details


Conflicting interests

Do you have any conflicting interests? *