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Detail, dynamics and depth: useful correctives for some current research trends

  • Barnaby Nelson (a1), Jessica A. Hartmann (a1) and Josef Parnas (a2)
Summary

Several research trends in contemporary psychiatry would benefit from greater emphasis on detailed assessment, modelling dynamic change, and micro-level analysis. This may assist with clarifying nosological and pathoaetiological issues. We make this case by referring to three areas: psychopathology and nosology; prediction research; and ‘big N’ data sets.

Declaration of interest

None.

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Copyright
Corresponding author
Correspondence: Barnaby Nelson, Orygen, 35 Poplar Rd (Locked Bag 10), Parkville, Victoria 3052, Australia. Email: Barnaby.nelson@orygen.org.au
References
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The British Journal of Psychiatry
  • ISSN: 0007-1250
  • EISSN: 1472-1465
  • URL: /core/journals/the-british-journal-of-psychiatry
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Detail, dynamics and depth: useful correctives for some current research trends

  • Barnaby Nelson (a1), Jessica A. Hartmann (a1) and Josef Parnas (a2)
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