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Doctor in court: What do lawyers really need from doctors, and what can doctors learn from lawyers?

  • Hugh Series (a1) and Jonathan Herring (a2)
Summary

Doctors and lawyers are usually well-educated, thoughtful people. Both groups have to assimilate large amounts of information and use it to make decisions. But the way that they do it is very different. Doctors have a better chance of helping courts to make good decisions if they understand exactly what courts need from them.

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Copyright
Corresponding author
Dr Hugh Series, Mental Health Centre, South Locality Older Adults CMHT, Abingdon Hospital, Marcham Road, Abingdon OX14 1AG, UK. Email: hugh.series@oxep.co.uk
Footnotes
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Declaration of interest

None.

Footnotes
References
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1 Ministry of Justice. Civil Procedure Rules Part 35. Ministry of Justice, 2017. (http://www.justice.gov.uk/courts/procedure-rules/civil/rules/part35).
2 Ministry of Justice. Criminal Procedure Rules Part 33. Ministry of Justice, 2014. (https://www.justice.gov.uk/courts/procedure-rules/criminal/docs/crim-proc-rules-2014-part-33.pdf).
3 Ministry of Justice. Family Procedure Rules Part 25. Ministry of Justice, 2017. (https://www.justice.gov.uk/courts/procedure-rules/family/parts/part_25).
4 Ministry of Justice. Practice Direction 35. Ministry of Justice, 2017. (https://www.justice.gov.uk/courts/procedure-rules/civil/rules/part35/pd_part35).
5 Pool v. General Medical Council [2014] EWHC 3791 (Admin).
6 BBC News. Sir Roy Meadow struck off by GMC. BBC News 2005; 15 July (http://news.bbc.co.uk/1/hi/health/4685511.stm).
7 Schneps, L, Colmez, C. Math on Trial. Basic Books, 2013.
8 Guardian. Doctor wins appeal over shaken baby syndrome trials evidence. Guardian 2016; 4 November (https://www.theguardian.com/society/2016/nov/04/doctor-waney-squier-wins-appeal-shaken-baby-syndrome-trials-evidence).
9 General Medical Council. Good Medical Practice. General Medical Council, 2013.
10 British Broadcasting Corporation. Undercover: justice for sale. Panorama 2014; 9 June.
11 Rix, K. Expert Psychiatric Evidence. RCPsych Publications, 2011.
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The British Journal of Psychiatry
  • ISSN: 0007-1250
  • EISSN: 1472-1465
  • URL: /core/journals/the-british-journal-of-psychiatry
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Doctor in court: What do lawyers really need from doctors, and what can doctors learn from lawyers?

  • Hugh Series (a1) and Jonathan Herring (a2)
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