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Domestic violence and its mental health correlates in Indian women

  • Shuba Kumar (a1), Lakshmanan Jeyaseelan (a2), Saradha Suresh (a3) and Ramesh Chandra Ahuja (a4)
Abstract
Background

Domestic spousal violence against women has far-reaching mental health implications.

Aims

To determine the association of domestic spousal violence with poor mental health.

Method

In a household survey of rural, urban non-slum and urban slum areas from seven sites in India, the population of women aged 15–49 years was sampled using probability proportionate to size. The Self Report Questionnaire was used to assess mental health status and a structured questionnaire elicited spousal experiences of violence.

Results

Of 9938 women surveyed, 40% reported poor mental health. Logistic regression showed that women reporting ‘any violence’ – ‘slap’, ‘hit’, ‘kick’ or ‘beat’ (OR 2.2, 95% CI 2.0–2.5) – or ‘all violence’ – all of the four types of physically violent behaviour (OR 3.5, 95% CI 2.94–3.51) – were at increased risk of poor mental health.

Conclusions

Findings indicate a strong association between domestic spousal violence and poor mental health, and underscore the need for appropriate interventions.

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Copyright
Corresponding author
Dr Shuba Kumar, Social Scientist and Manager, India Clinical Epidemiology Network, No. 58 Venkatratnam Nagar, Adayar, Chennai – 600 020, India. Tel: +91 44 24422477; fax: +91 44 24455378; e-mail: indiaclen@touchtelindia.net
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Declaration of interest

None. Funding detailed in Acknowledgements.

Footnotes
References
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The British Journal of Psychiatry
  • ISSN: 0007-1250
  • EISSN: 1472-1465
  • URL: /core/journals/the-british-journal-of-psychiatry
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Domestic violence and its mental health correlates in Indian women

  • Shuba Kumar (a1), Lakshmanan Jeyaseelan (a2), Saradha Suresh (a3) and Ramesh Chandra Ahuja (a4)
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