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Economic evaluation of the anti-stigma social marketing campaign in England 2009-2011

  • Sara Evans-Lacko (a1), Claire Henderson (a1), Graham Thornicroft (a1) and Paul McCrone (a1)
Abstract
Background

Evidence on the economic impact of social marketing antistigma campaigns in relation to people with mental illness is limited.

Aims

To describe the economic impact of the Time to Change (TTC) anti-stigma social marketing campaign, including the potential effects on the wider economy.

Method

Data collected for the evaluation of TTC were combined with the social marketing campaign expenditure data to investigate differences in knowledge, attitudes and behaviour in relation to campaign awareness. To evaluate the return on investment, we applied a decision model that estimated the impact on employment for people with depression.

Results

Based on average national social marketing campaign costs, the economic benefits outweighed costs even if the campaign resulted in only 1% more people with depression accessing services and gaining employment if they experienced a health improvement The cost per person with improved intended behaviour was at most £4 if we assume the campaign was responsible for 50% of the change. Costs associated with improved knowledge and attitudes, however, were more variable.

Conclusions

The findings suggest that the TTC anti-stigma social marketing campaign is a potentially cost-effective and low-cost intervention for reducing the impact of stigma on people with mental health problems.

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Copyright
Royal College of Psychiatrists, This paper accords with the NIH Public Access policy and is governed by the licence available athttp://www.rcpsych.ac.uk/pdf/NIH%20licence%20agreement.pdf
Corresponding author
Dr Claire Henderson, Health Service and Population Research Department, Institute of Psychiatry, De Crespigny Park, London SE5 8AF, UK. Email: claire.1.henderson@kcl.ac.uk
Footnotes
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Declaration of interest

G.T. has received grants for stigma-related research in the past 5 years from Lundbeck UK and from the National institute for Health Research, and has acted as a consultant to the UK Office of the Chief Scientist.

Footnotes
References
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Economic evaluation of the anti-stigma social marketing campaign in England 2009-2011

  • Sara Evans-Lacko (a1), Claire Henderson (a1), Graham Thornicroft (a1) and Paul McCrone (a1)
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