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Exercise and internet-based cognitive–behavioural therapy for depression: multicentre randomised controlled trial with 12-month follow-up

  • Mats Hallgren (a1), Björg Helgadóttir (a2), Matthew P. Herring (a3), Zangin Zeebari (a4), Nils Lindefors (a5), Viktor Kaldo (a5), Agneta Öjehagen (a6) and Yvonne Forsell (a4)...

Abstract

Background

Evidence-based treatment of depression continues to grow, but successful treatment and maintenance of treatment response remains limited.

Aims

To compare the effectiveness of exercise, internet-based cognitive–behavioural therapy (ICBT) and usual care for depression.

Method

A multicentre, three-group parallel, randomised controlled trial was conducted with assessment at 3 months (post-treatment) and 12 months (primary end-point). Outcome assessors were masked to group allocation. Computer-generated allocation was performed externally in blocks of 36 and the ratio of participants per group was 1:1:1. In total, 945 adults with mild to moderate depression aged 18–71 years were recruited from primary healthcare centres located throughout Sweden. Participants were randomly assigned to one of three 12-week interventions: supervised group exercise, clinician-supported ICBT or usual care by a physician. The primary outcome was depression severity assessed by the Montgomery–Åsberg Depression Rating Scale (MADRS).

Results

The response rate at 12-month follow-up was 84%. Depression severity reduced significantly in all three treatment groups in a quadratic trend over time. Mean differences in MADRS score at 12 months were 12.1 (ICBT), 11.4 (exercise) and 9.7 (usual care). At the primary end-point the group × time interaction was significant for both exercise and ICBT. Effect sizes for both interventions were small to moderate.

Conclusions

The long-term treatment effects reported here suggest that prescribed exercise and clinician-supported ICBT should be considered for the treatment of mild to moderate depression in adults.

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Copyright

Corresponding author

Mats Hallgren, Widerströmskahuset pl.10, Tomtebodavägen 18A, Karolinska Institutet, Solna 171 77, Sweden. Email: Mats.hallgren@ki.se

Footnotes

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Declaration of interest

None.

Footnotes

References

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Exercise and internet-based cognitive–behavioural therapy for depression: multicentre randomised controlled trial with 12-month follow-up

  • Mats Hallgren (a1), Björg Helgadóttir (a2), Matthew P. Herring (a3), Zangin Zeebari (a4), Nils Lindefors (a5), Viktor Kaldo (a5), Agneta Öjehagen (a6) and Yvonne Forsell (a4)...

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Exercise and internet-based cognitive–behavioural therapy for depression: multicentre randomised controlled trial with 12-month follow-up

  • Mats Hallgren (a1), Björg Helgadóttir (a2), Matthew P. Herring (a3), Zangin Zeebari (a4), Nils Lindefors (a5), Viktor Kaldo (a5), Agneta Öjehagen (a6) and Yvonne Forsell (a4)...
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