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The future of academic psychiatry may be social

  • Stefan Priebe (a1), Tom Burns (a2) and Tom K. J. Craig (a3)

Summary

The past 30 years have produced no discoveries leading to major changes in psychiatric practice. The rules regulating research and a dominant neurobiological paradigm may both have stifled creativity. Embracing a social paradigm could generate real progress and, simultaneously, make the profession more attractive.

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Copyright

Corresponding author

Stefan Priebe, Unit for Social and Community Psychiatry, Academic Unit, Newham Centre for Mental Health, London E13 8SP, UK. Email: s.priebe@qmul.ac.uk

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Declaration of interest

None.

Footnotes

References

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1 Craddock, N, Antebi, D, Attenburrow, M-J, Bailey, A, Carson, A, Cowen, P, et al Wake-up call for British psychiatry. Br J Psychiatry 2008; 193: 69.
2 Katschnig, H. Are psychiatrists an endangered species? Observations on internal and external challenges to the profession. World Psychiatry 2010; 9: 21–8.
3 Saraga, M, Stiefel, F. Psychiatry and the scientific fallacy. Acta Psychiatr Scand 2011; 124: 70–2.
4 Bolton, D, Hill, G. Mind, Meaning and Mental Disorder: The Nature of Causal Explanation in Psychology and Psychiatry. Oxford University Press, 2004.
5 Jaspers, K. General Psychopathology: Volume 1. Johns Hopkins University Press, 1997.

The future of academic psychiatry may be social

  • Stefan Priebe (a1), Tom Burns (a2) and Tom K. J. Craig (a3)

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