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Great wits and madness: More near allied?

  • Kay Redfield Jamison (a1)

Summary

A purported association between creativity and psychopathology is ancient, persistent and controversial. Biographical research, studies of living artists and writers, and investigations into the cognitive and temperamental factors linked to both creativity and mood disorders suggest a more specific link to bipolar illness. A new, large and well-designed population-based study adds further support to this connection.

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References

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Great wits and madness: More near allied?

  • Kay Redfield Jamison (a1)

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Great wits and madness: More near allied?

  • Kay Redfield Jamison (a1)
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