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A guide to cost-effectiveness acceptability curves

  • Elisabeth Fenwick (a1) and Sarah Byford (a2)

Summary

Use of cost-effectiveness acceptability curves, as a method for summarising information on uncertainty cost-effectiveness, has become widespread within applied studies. This includes several studies in the mental health field. This editorial uses examples from recent papers to illustrate how cost effectiveness acceptability curves are constructed, what they represent and how they should be interpreted.

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Copyright

Corresponding author

Dr Elisabeth Fenwick, Department of Economics and Related Studies, University of York, Heslington, York YO10 5DD, UK. Tel: +44(0) 1904 321451; fax: +44(0) 1904 321402; e-mail: ealf100@york.ac.uk

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Declaration of interest

None.

Footnotes

References

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Bower, P., Byford, S., Barber, J., et al (2003) Meta-analysis of data on costs from trials of counselling in primary care: using individual patient data to overcome sample size limitations in economic analyses. British Medical Journal, 326, 12471250.
Briggs, A. & Fenn, P. (1998) Confidence intervals or surfaces? Uncertainty on the cost-effectiveness plane. Health Economics, 7, 723740.
Briggs, A. & Gray, A. (1999) Handling uncertainty when performing economic evaluation of healthcare interventions. Health Technology Assessment, 3, 2.
Byford, S., Knapp, M., Greenshields, J., et al (2003) Cost-effectiveness of brief cognitive behaviour therapy versus treatment as usual in recurrent deliberate self-harm: a rational decision making approach. Psychological Medicine, 33, 977986.
Fenwick, E., Claxton, K. & Sculpher, M. (2001) Representing uncertainty: the role of cost-effectiveness acceptability curves. Health Economics, 10, 779787.
Fenwick, E., O'Brien, B. & Briggs, A. (2004) Cost-effectiveness acceptability curves – facts, fallacies and frequently asked questions. Health Economics, 13, 405415.
Haddock, G., Barrowclough, C., Tarrier, N., et al (2003) Cognitive-behavioural therapy and motivational intervention for schizophrenia and substance misuse: 18-month outcomes of a randomised controlled trial. British Journal of Psychiatry, 183, 418426.
Lothgren, M. & Zethraeus, N. (2000) Definition, interpretation and calculation of cost-effectiveness acceptability curves. Health Economics, 9, 623630.
McCrone, P., Knapp, M., Proudfoot, J., et al (2004) Cost-effectiveness of computerised cognitive-behavioural therapy for anxiety and depression in primary care: randomised controlled trial. British Journal of Psychiatry, 185, 5562.
Miller, P., Chilvers, C., Dewey, M., et al (2003) Counselling versus antidepressanttherapy for the treatment of mild to moderate depression in primary care: economic analysis. International Journal of Technology Assessment in Health Care, 19, 8090.
O'Brien, B. & Briggs, A. (2002) Analysis of uncertainty in health care cost-effectiveness studies: an introduction to statistical issues and methods. Statistical Methods in Medical Research, 11, 455468.
Scott, J., Palmer, S., Paykel, E., et al (2003) Use of cognitive therapy for relapse prevention in chronic depression: cost-effectiveness study. British Journal of Psychiatry, 182, 221227.
Van Hout, B. A., Al, M. J., Gordon, G. S., et al (1994) Costs, effects and C/E-ratios alongside a clinical trial. Health Economics, 3, 309319.
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The British Journal of Psychiatry
  • ISSN: 0007-1250
  • EISSN: 1472-1465
  • URL: /core/journals/the-british-journal-of-psychiatry
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A guide to cost-effectiveness acceptability curves

  • Elisabeth Fenwick (a1) and Sarah Byford (a2)
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