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Impact of co-located welfare advice in healthcare settings: prospective quasi-experimental controlled study

  • Charlotte Woodhead (a1), Mizanur Khondoker (a2), Robin Lomas (a3) and Rosalind Raine (a4)
Abstract
Background

Evaluations of primary healthcare co-located welfare advice services have been methodologically limited.

Aims

To examine the impact and cost-consequences of co-located benefits and debt advice on mental health and service use.

Method

Prospective, controlled quasi-experimental study in eight intervention and nine comparator sites across North Thames. Changes in the proportion meeting criteria for common mental disorder (CMD, 12-item General Health Questionnaire); well-being scores (Shortened Warwick and Edinburgh Mental Well-being Scale), 3-month GP consultation rate and financial strain were measured alongside funding costs and financial gains.

Results

Relative to controls, CMD reduced among women (ratio of odds ratios (rOR) = 0.37, 95% CI 0.20–0.70) and Black advice recipients (rOR=0.09, 95% CI 0.03–0.28). Individuals whose advice resulted in positive outcomes demonstrated improved well-being scores (β coefficient 1.29, 95% CI 0.25–2.32). Reductions in financial strain (rOR=042, 95% CI 0.23–0.77) but no changes in 3-month consultation rate were found. Per capita, advice recipients received £15 per £1 of funder investment.

Conclusions

Co-located welfare advice improves short-term mental health and well-being, reduces financial strain and generates considerable financial returns.

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Copyright
This is an open access article distributed under the terms of the Creative Commons Attribution (CC BY) licence.
Corresponding author
Charlotte Woodhead, Department of Applied Health Research, University College London, London WC1E 6BT, UK. Email: c.woodhead@ucl.ac.uk
Footnotes
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Declaration of interest

None.

Footnotes
References
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Impact of co-located welfare advice in healthcare settings: prospective quasi-experimental controlled study

  • Charlotte Woodhead (a1), Mizanur Khondoker (a2), Robin Lomas (a3) and Rosalind Raine (a4)
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