Skip to main content Accessibility help
×
Home

Impact of the Canterbury earthquakes on dispensing of psychiatric medication for children and adolescents: longitudinal quantitative study

  • Ben Beaglehole (a1), Stephanie Moor (a1), Tao Zhang (a2), Gregory J. Hamilton (a3), Roger T. Mulder (a4), Joseph M. Boden (a5), Christopher M. A. Frampton (a4) and Caroline J. Bell (a5)...

Abstract

Background

Natural disasters are increasing in frequency and impact; they cause widespread disruption and adversity throughout the world. The Canterbury earthquakes of 2010–2011 were devastating for the people of Christchurch, New Zealand. It is important to understand the impact of this disaster on the mental health of children and adolescents.

Aims

To report psychiatric medication use for children and adolescents following the Canterbury earthquakes.

Method

Dispensing data from community pharmacies for the medication classes antidepressants, antipsychotics, anxiolytics, sedatives/hypnotics and methylphenidate are routinely recorded in a national database. Longitudinal data are available for residents of the Canterbury District Health Board (DHB) and nationally. We compared dispensing data for children and adolescents residing in Canterbury DHB with national dispensing data to assess the impact of the Canterbury earthquakes on psychotropic prescribing for children and adolescents.

Results

After longer-term trends and population adjustments are considered, a subtle adverse effect of the Canterbury earthquakes on dispensing of antidepressants was detected. However, the Canterbury earthquakes were not associated with higher dispensing rates for antipsychotics, anxiolytics, sedatives/hypnotics or methylphenidate.

Conclusions

Mental disorders or psychological distress of a sufficient severity to result in treatment of children and adolescents with psychiatric medication were not substantially affected by the Canterbury earthquakes.

  • View HTML
    • Send article to Kindle

      To send this article to your Kindle, first ensure no-reply@cambridge.org is added to your Approved Personal Document E-mail List under your Personal Document Settings on the Manage Your Content and Devices page of your Amazon account. Then enter the ‘name’ part of your Kindle email address below. Find out more about sending to your Kindle. Find out more about sending to your Kindle.

      Note you can select to send to either the @free.kindle.com or @kindle.com variations. ‘@free.kindle.com’ emails are free but can only be sent to your device when it is connected to wi-fi. ‘@kindle.com’ emails can be delivered even when you are not connected to wi-fi, but note that service fees apply.

      Find out more about the Kindle Personal Document Service.

      Impact of the Canterbury earthquakes on dispensing of psychiatric medication for children and adolescents: longitudinal quantitative study
      Available formats
      ×

      Send article to Dropbox

      To send this article to your Dropbox account, please select one or more formats and confirm that you agree to abide by our usage policies. If this is the first time you use this feature, you will be asked to authorise Cambridge Core to connect with your <service> account. Find out more about sending content to Dropbox.

      Impact of the Canterbury earthquakes on dispensing of psychiatric medication for children and adolescents: longitudinal quantitative study
      Available formats
      ×

      Send article to Google Drive

      To send this article to your Google Drive account, please select one or more formats and confirm that you agree to abide by our usage policies. If this is the first time you use this feature, you will be asked to authorise Cambridge Core to connect with your <service> account. Find out more about sending content to Google Drive.

      Impact of the Canterbury earthquakes on dispensing of psychiatric medication for children and adolescents: longitudinal quantitative study
      Available formats
      ×

Copyright

References

Hide All
1Keogh, B. Canterbury earthquakes: kids born after disaster inheriting trauma from parents through DNA, schools dealing with more behaviour issues. NZ Herald, 2018: 31 March.
2Stewart, A. Young Cantabs seek mental health help 35,000 times in a year. Stuff, 2016: 18 July.
3Norris, FH, Friedman, MJ, Watson, PJ, Byrne, CM, Diaz, E, Kaniasty, K. 60,000 disaster victims speak: Part I. An empirical review of the empirical literature, 1981–2001. Psychiatry 2002; 65: 207–39.
4Goldmann, E, Galea, S. Mental health consequences of disasters. Annu Rev Public Health 2014; 35: 169–83.
5Rubonis, AV, Bickman, L. Psychological impairment in the wake of disaster: the disaster-psychopathology relationship. Psychol Bull 1991; 109: 384–99.
6Beaglehole, B, Mulder, RT, Frampton, CM, Boden, JM, Newton-Howes, G, Bell, CJ. Psychological distress and psychiatric disorder after natural disasters: systematic review and meta-analysis. Br J Psychiatry 2018; 213: 716–22.
7Bartels, SA, VanRooyen, MJ. Medical complications associated with earthquakes. Lancet 2012; 379: 748–57.
8Bromet, E, Dew, MA. Review of psychiatric epidemiologic research on disasters. Epidemiol Rev 1995; 17: 113–9.
9Aptekar, L, Boore, JA. The emotional effects of disaster on children: a review of the literature. Int J Ment Health 1990; 19: 7790.
10Vogel, JM, Vernberg, EM. Part 1: Children's psychological responses to disasters. J Clin Child Psychol 1993; 22: 464–84.
11Wang, CW, Chan, CL, Ho, RT. Prevalence and trajectory of psychopathology among child and adolescent survivors of disasters: a systematic review of epidemiological studies across 1987-2011. Soc Psychiatry Psychiatr Epidemiol 2013; 48: 1697–720.
12Hafstad, GS, Gil-Rivas, V, Kilmer, RP, Raeder, S. Parental adjustment, family functioning, and posttraumatic growth among Norwegian children and adolescents following a natural disaster. Am J Orthopsychiatry 2010; 80: 248–57.
13Rossi, A, Maggio, R, Riccardi, I, Allegrini, F, Stratta, P. A quantitative analysis of antidepressant and antipsychotic prescriptions following an earthquake in Italy. J Trauma Stress 2011; 24: 129–32.
14Usher, K, Brown, LH, Buettner, P, Glass, B, Boon, H, West, C, et al. Rate of prescription of antidepressant and anxiolytic drugs after Cyclone Yasi in North Queensland. Prehosp Disaster Med 2012; 27: 519–23.
15Beaglehole, B, Bell, C, Frampton, C, Hamilton, G, McKean, A. The impact of the Canterbury earthquakes on prescribing for mental health. Aust N Z J Psychiatry 2015; 49: 742–50.
16Malhi, GS, Bassett, D, Boyce, P, Bryant, R, Fitzgerald, PB, Fritz, K, et al. Royal Australian and New Zealand College of Psychiatrists clinical practice guidelines for mood disorders. Aust N Z J Psychiatry 2015; 49: 1087–206.
17Andrews, G, Bell, C, Boyce, P, Gale, C, Lampe, L, Marwat, O, et al. Royal Australian and New Zealand College of Psychiatrists clinical practice guidelines for the treatment of panic disorder, social anxiety disorder and generalised anxiety disorder. Aust N Z J Psychiatry 2018; 52: 1109–72.
18Beaglehole, B, Mulder, RT, Boden, JM, Bell, CJ. A systematic review of the psychological impacts of the Canterbury earthquakes on mental health. Aust N Z J Public Health 2019; 43: 274–80.
19Thomson, J, Seers, K, Frampton, C, Hider, P, Moor, S. Sequential population study of the impact of earthquakes on the emotional and behavioural well-being of 4-year-olds in Canterbury, New Zealand. J Paediatr Child Health 2016; 52: 1824.
20Liberty, K, Tarren-Sweeney, M, Macfarlane, S, Basu, A, Reid, J. Behavior problems and post-traumatic stress symptoms in children beginning school: a comparison of pre- and post-earthquake groups. PLoS Curr 2016; 8: doi 10.1371/currents.dis.2821c82fbc27d0c2aa9e00cff532b402.
21Norris, FH. Disaster research methods: past progress and future directions. J Trauma Stress 2006; 19: 173–84.
22Exeter, D, Robinson, E, Wheeler, A. Antidepressant dispensing trends in New Zealand between 2004 and 2007. Aust N Z J Psychiatry 2009; 43: 1131–40.
23Tannenbaum, C, Lexchin, J, Tamblyn, R, Romans, S. Indicators for measuring mental health: towards better surveillance. Healthc Policy 2009; 5: e177–86.
24Sibley, CG, Bulbulia, J. Faith after an earthquake: a longitudinal study of religion and perceived health before and after the 2011 Christchurch New Zealand earthquake. PloS One 2012; 7(12): e49648.

Keywords

Type Description Title
UNKNOWN
Supplementary materials

Beaglehole et al. supplementary material
Beaglehole et al. supplementary material

 Unknown (236 KB)
236 KB

Impact of the Canterbury earthquakes on dispensing of psychiatric medication for children and adolescents: longitudinal quantitative study

  • Ben Beaglehole (a1), Stephanie Moor (a1), Tao Zhang (a2), Gregory J. Hamilton (a3), Roger T. Mulder (a4), Joseph M. Boden (a5), Christopher M. A. Frampton (a4) and Caroline J. Bell (a5)...

Metrics

Full text views

Total number of HTML views: 0
Total number of PDF views: 0 *
Loading metrics...

Abstract views

Total abstract views: 0 *
Loading metrics...

* Views captured on Cambridge Core between <date>. This data will be updated every 24 hours.

Usage data cannot currently be displayed

Impact of the Canterbury earthquakes on dispensing of psychiatric medication for children and adolescents: longitudinal quantitative study

  • Ben Beaglehole (a1), Stephanie Moor (a1), Tao Zhang (a2), Gregory J. Hamilton (a3), Roger T. Mulder (a4), Joseph M. Boden (a5), Christopher M. A. Frampton (a4) and Caroline J. Bell (a5)...
Submit a response

eLetters

No eLetters have been published for this article.

×

Reply to: Submit a response


Your details


Conflicting interests

Do you have any conflicting interests? *