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Inequality: an underacknowledged source of mental illness and distress

  • Kate E. Pickett (a1) and Richard G. Wilkinson (a2)

Summary

Greater income inequality is associated with higher prevalence of mental illness and drug misuse in rich societies. There are threefold differences in the proportion of the population suffering from mental illness between more and less equal countries. This relationship is most likely mediated by the impact of inequality on the quality of social relationships and the scale of status differentiation in different societies.

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Copyright

Corresponding author

Kate E. Pickett, Department of Health Sciences, University of York, Seebohm Rowntree Building, Area 2, Heslington, York YO10 5DD, UK. Email: kp6@york.ac.uk

Footnotes

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Declaration of interest

None.

Footnotes

References

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Inequality: an underacknowledged source of mental illness and distress

  • Kate E. Pickett (a1) and Richard G. Wilkinson (a2)

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