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Influence of supplementary vitamins, minerals and essential fatty acids on the antisocial behaviour of young adult prisoners: Randomised, placebo-controlled trial

  • C. Bernard Gesch (a1), Sean M. Hammond (a2), Sarah E. Hampson (a3), Anita Eves (a4) and Martin J. Crowder (a5)...
Abstract
Background

There is evidence that offenders consume diets lacking in essential nutrients and this could adversely affect their behaviour.

Aims

To test empirically if physiologically adequate intakes of vitamins, minerals and essential fatty acids cause a reduction in antisocial behaviour.

Method

Experimental, double-blind, placebo-controlled, randomised trial of nutritional supplements on 231 young adult prisoners, comparing disciplinary offences before and during supplementation.

Results

Compared with placebos, those receiving the active capsules committed an average of 26.3% (95% CI 8.3-44.33%) fewer offences (P=0.03, two-tailed). Compared to baseline, the effect on those taking active supplements for a minimum of 2 weeks (n=172) was an average 35.1% (95% CI 16.3-53.9%) reduction of offences (P < 0.001, two-tailed), whereas placebos remained within standard error.

Conclusions

Antisocial behaviour in prisons, including violence, are reduced by vitamins, minerals and essential fatty acids with similar implications for those eating poor diets in the community.

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Copyright
Corresponding author
C. Bernard Gesch, University Laboratory of Physiology University of Oxford, Parks Road, Oxford OX1 3PT, UK
Footnotes
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Declaration of interest

The researchwas supported by a grant from the research charityNatural Justice (see Acknowledgements) andmanaged from the Universityof Surrey. Scotia Pharmaceuticals Ltd and Unigreg Ltd suppliednutritional supplements.

Footnotes
References
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Influence of supplementary vitamins, minerals and essential fatty acids on the antisocial behaviour of young adult prisoners: Randomised, placebo-controlled trial

  • C. Bernard Gesch (a1), Sean M. Hammond (a2), Sarah E. Hampson (a3), Anita Eves (a4) and Martin J. Crowder (a5)...
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